I really like Sidux, but I don't use it

Story: Three Great Distributions for Christmas: sidux, AntiX M8.0 and SimplyMEPIS 8.0Total Replies: 5
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Steven_Rosenber

Dec 24, 2008
4:47 PM EST
I spent a bit of time using the Sidux live CD with Xfce. I had a box with 1 GB of RAM, and the whole thing just ran great.

I really didn't know how much of what was working so well was due to Debian Sid itself or what the Sidux team was doing to it after the fact, but it worked a lot better than something that is billed as Unstable.

At the time, I was having so much trouble with Debian Lenny (aka Testing) that I couldn't quite figure out how (or if) running Unstable, even under the auspices of Sidux, could be better.

Once I figured out how it all worked, I liked the way that Sidux configures networking, and I really liked the application they have for package management, the name of which escapes me but which is something totally different from Synaptic. It made it easy to bring in a limited number of very important packages, such as OpenOffice (which was configured with fonts that looked and worked better than what Ubuntu was shipping at the time).

The reason I didn't stick with Sidux was that however well it worked, my desire to run the absolute latest version of just about any application or package — be it OpenOffice, Firefox, or things deeper in the system — just isn't all that strong.

I'm not unhappy to be running OO 2.0 in Debian Etch, and with something as relatively old as CentOS/RHEL 5 now offering OO 2.3 (???) and FF 3, I don't really need to be more cutting-edge than the "average" distro, however you define it.

I just want everything to work. (And I'd like to figure out how to do semi-professional video editing -- with the ability to bring together multiple audio and video clips -- in a FOSS environment with out causing myself too much pain ... but that's another woe for another day).

It seems that there's always at least one little feature in a given Ubuntu (or Fedora or Slackware or ...) release that makes me want to upgrade, and some systems (Fedora, OpenBSD, ZenWalk) make upgrading practically mandatory since releases are only supported for relatively short periods of time, but the urge to do nothing if I so choose is a powerful one indeed.

While I still consider myself a hobbyist at this whole game of OS roulette, as do many other LXer types, having distros such as Debian Stable, Slackware, Ubuntu LTS and CentOS/RHEL that can sit on a box for years and still get security patches and maybe a bug fix every once in a while, is an option I'm finding more and more attractive as the number of installs I'm managing grows along with my herd of old computers ...
Scott_Ruecker

Dec 24, 2008
5:10 PM EST
I ran sidux on one of my machines for several months but at the time I struggled to get it to do what I wanted with my video and music. I know it was my lack of knowledge but after a while I got tired of wrestling with it. And I still had the itch to try out other flavors so I did.

rijelkentaurus

Dec 26, 2008
8:27 AM EST
I have Sidux dual-booting on my work machine now. Great bleeding edge stuff with super reliability, it's a great option. I am still using Ubuntu for now at home, it's going quite well, but as it ages (I like having the latest and greatest for my jukebox, for servers I like old and moldy) I will probably switch it over to Sidux.
hkwint

Dec 27, 2008
2:25 PM EST
Quoting:...but at the time I struggled to get it to do what I wanted with my video and music.


Point a camcorder at your PC, take your drumsticks to beat on top of it (the PC, not the camcorder you silly!) and you should be fine.
masinick

Dec 29, 2008
3:48 PM EST
For you guys who really don't need a system with the latest cutting edge stuff, you just want something that works, and you have little interest in playing with it, other than to keep it secure, take a look at the SimplyMEPIS project instead. You cannot beat SimplyMEPIS for stability - even if the final version is not released. It will run fine with what is there now, and even if you don't update it for a month, you will be fine. Updates are easy, too - an update icon appears in the task bar with the number of updates available. As long as it remains at "0" there are no updates. When there ARE updates, no need to panic. I recommend installing them, but if you wait a month, no big deal.

Cutting edge buffs, though, sidux is THE choice. You can update on a daily, weekly, or monthly basis and use software that is among the most current and usable software available.

People wanting a really fast, quick booting, responsive system that is light on resource usage ought to look at antiX. A cross between MEPIS and sidux, you can morph antiX into either SimplyMEPIS or sidux if you want, you can leave it alone, or you can tailor it into your own custom system - extremely flexible. But FAST is its main attraction, small and fast.
Sander_Marechal

Dec 29, 2008
6:07 PM EST
Quoting:even if the final version is not released. It will run fine with what is there now, and even if you don't update it for a month, you will be fine. Updates are easy, too - an update icon appears in the task bar with the number of updates available. As long as it remains at "0" there are no updates


Sounds just like Debian stable.

Quoting:. When there ARE updates, no need to panic. I recommend installing them, but if you wait a month, no big deal.


It's never wise to wait with updates.

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