Missing Link?

Story: To my daughter's high school programming teacherTotal Replies: 14
Author Content
Bob_Robertson

Sep 11, 2013
12:02 PM EDT
Missing Link?
Bob_Robertson

Sep 11, 2013
12:04 PM EDT
https://www.usenix.org/blog/my-daughters-high-school-programming-teacher
bob

Sep 11, 2013
12:39 PM EDT
fixed
Bob_Robertson

Sep 11, 2013
12:50 PM EDT
Cool, thanks.

It's an excellent article and well worth reading.
gus3

Sep 11, 2013
1:04 PM EDT
A high school programming class? This kid is already light-years ahead of the other students. The curriculum is, practically by definition, geared towards the "lowest common denominator".

It's no excuse for what this girl went through. I want to know only one thing: Has anyone filed a police report?
djohnston

Sep 11, 2013
3:57 PM EDT
Quoting:I want to know only one thing: Has anyone filed a police report?


No offense intended, but that will only exacerbate the problem, and may lead to unforseen consequences. I think Rikki took the right tack. Her website is here.

I don't understand why boys/men, (or, as Rikki put it, "men boys"), feel so threatened by females who are technically proficient. Is it an inferiority complex? Or, has the downward spiral in morals and chivalry accelerated in the U.S.? There's no excuse for bullying others. Someone who berates or belittles someone else does so out of jealousy or ignorance. I never witnessed boys bullying girls in public school when I was growing up.

mbaehrlxer

Sep 12, 2013
1:12 AM EDT
here is one theory: one insult among boys is to tell them they are "weak like a girl". as a result many avoid doing things that girls would do. but this also implies that girls need to be kept out of things that boys like to do.

one way to prevent this is to make programming and learning about computers a required subject for all students, thus ensuring gender balance in the classroom and reducing the opportunity for any one being singled out for their choice.

(at the same time i'd also require every student to attend homemaking classes. cooking is a skill everyone should learn, and i believe things like stitching and knitting are skills worth learning for a well rounded education.)

greetings, eMBee.
gary_newell

Sep 12, 2013
3:29 AM EDT
I get the point of the article but there were also some strange comments throughout such as mentioning she was a beta tester for Jaunty and the fact that she mentions VB programming.

How long ago did all this happen?

Jaunty was version 9 of Ubuntu and virtually nobody uses VB anymore. Plenties of people use VB.NET but that is different because it is part of the .NET programming framework and so isn't out of date at all if you are a Windows programmer. (It does have a lot of inconsistencies compared to c# though)

The article hints that the daughter is in India. Was she in India when she took the course or is she in India now that she has graduated? If she took the course in India then rightly or wrongly that is their culture.





mbaehrlxer

Sep 12, 2013
5:02 AM EDT
it's in the beginning of the article. mentioning jaunty is just history to show the capabilities of the girl.

the actual events were apparently last year in her junior/senior year (after which she went to india)

but noone using VB anymore wouldn't stop a teacher from continuing to teach it. to be fair though, whether a language is popular is quite irrelevant for learning to code. what matters is that the language is suitable to teach relevant concepts. i don't know if that is VB, but that's a different issue (and hopefully the one the author is concerned about)

and as for your last comment, is that really indias culture? regardless, culture is no excuse for harassment.

greetings, eMBee.
Bob_Robertson

Sep 12, 2013
8:52 AM EDT
> culture is no excuse for harassment.

Culture is often the reason.

One aspect of a culture is the relationship between men and women.

Weak minded people attack that which frightens them. Women hold immense power over men which is generally not discussed, and men with weak minds are afraid of that power.

This fear manifests in many ways, including the kind of bullying the article cites. There is also .... I have to look this up, hold on ... Ok, the Lacey Green video just calls them "Creeps", who cat-call, follow, and generally treat any woman they see (that doesn't have a man with them at the time) like a piece of meat.

That's culture, too.
skelband

Sep 12, 2013
3:36 PM EDT
> Culture is often the reason.

My son knows this to be true and, sorry for all those would suggest it is not so, racial origins plays a crucial part.

Sexism is largely dominated by racial culture. Here, in BC Canada, misogynistic opinions seem to develop almost exclusively in boys from certain Eastern origins. They are "received wisdom".

Honestly, some parents need a good slap.
Bob_Robertson

Sep 12, 2013
3:38 PM EDT
> some parents need a good slap

This is very likely the least controversial statement in the entire thread.
mbaehrlxer

Sep 13, 2013
11:41 AM EDT
culture is often the reason, indeed. and all the more cause to stand up against it and try to change it.

culture can and should evolve. beating children used to be culture too. today it is illegal in many countries.

if this is our culture, it's time we changed it.

greetings, eMBee.
Bob_Robertson

Sep 13, 2013
4:09 PM EDT
It's not mine.
mbaehrlxer

Sep 16, 2013
12:45 AM EDT
sure, it's not mine either. but if it happens in our community and we tolerate it then we are part of the problem and it becomes our culture.

greetings, eMBee.

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