Showing headlines posted by Scott_Ruecker

« Previous ( 1 ... 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 ... 1021 ) Next »

How I Got Here: Marcus Ranum

Dennis Fisher talks with security pioneer Marcus Ranum about writing an early Internet firewall at DEC, the security gold-rush era of the 1990s and early 2000s, why he never patented most of the ideas he has come up with and how he found peace of mind.

Open source a clear choice for CMS development

My digital agency opened its doors in January of 1996. Back then, there were no proprietary Content Management Systems. Microsoft was still dismissing the notion of the web as a viable platform for business or e-commerce activity. If a website needed functionality, unless we could find something at Matt's Script Archive to accomplish the task, we built most of it from the ground up in Perl.

How to become a valued OpenStack contributor

Adrian Otto is project team lead for OpenStack projects Magnum and Solum. Otto founded the OpenStack Containers team in 2014, and is a Principal Architect at Rackspace. He is a serial entrepeneur, with 20 years of experience in technology leadership roles, and gets excited about evolving new technology to shape the future of cloud computing.

10 Security Questions To Ask A Cloud Service Provider

As security teams try to help line-of-business users and other IT practitioners take advantage of cloud benefits as safely as possible, they're increasingly stepping into the role of trusted advisor. The scalability, flexibility, and convenience of software-as-a-service (SaaS), infrastructure-as-a-service (IaaS), and platform-as-a-service (PaaS) offerings frequently come at the cost of added risk to the business. It is up to information security pros to help evaluate potential providers to best evaluate where those risks are coming from.

Dan Kaminsky on VENOM

Dennis Fisher talks with Dan Kaminsky about the VENOM bug, the value of virtual machine escapes, why everyone wants to make every bug the worst one of all time or just a bunch of hype and what the Avengers have to do with vulnerability disclosure. - See more at: https://threatpost.com/dan-kaminsky-on-venom/112810#sthash.p...

SPDX v2 simplifies open source license dependency tracking

The Linux Foundation has updated its SPDX standard to v2.0, enhancing the ability to track complex open source license dependencies to ensure compliance. The Linux Foundation (LF) released version 1.0 of the Software Package Data Exchange (SPDX) standard in 2011, promoting it as a common format for sharing data about software licenses and copyrights. Now the LF’s SPDX workgroup has released version 2.0 of the standard, with new features that let you relate SPDX documents to each other to provide a “three-dimensional” relationship view of license dependencies.

Update on Digital Rights Management and Firefox

A year ago, we announced the start of efforts to implement support for a component in Firefox that would allow content wrapped in Digital Rights Management (DRM) to be played within the HTML5 video tag. This was a hard decision because of our Mission and the closed nature of DRM. As we explained then, we are enabling DRM in order to provide our users with the features they require in a browser and allow them to continue accessing premium video content. We don’t believe DRM is a desirable market solution, but it’s currently the only way to watch a sought-after segment of content.

SPDX v2 adds 3D view of license dependencies

The Linux Foundation has updated its SPDX standard to version 2.0, adding a 3D view of open source license dependencies to enable easier compliance. The Linux Foundation (LF) released version 1.0 of the Software Package Data Exchange (SPDX) standard in 2011, promoting it as a common format for sharing data about software licenses and copyrights. Now the LF’s SPDX workgroup has released version 2.0 of the standard, with new features that let you relate SPDX documents to each other to provide a “three-dimensional” relationship view of license dependencies.

Infinite BusyBox with systemd

In this article, I demonstrate a method to build one Linux system within another using the latest utilities within the systemd suite of management tools. The guest OS container design focuses upon BusyBox and Dropbear for the userspace system utilities, but I also work through methods for running more general application software so the containers are actually useful.

User stories at Summit and more OpenStack news

Interested in keeping track of what's happening in the open source cloud? Opensource.com is your source for news in OpenStack, the open source cloud infrastructure project.

Vivid Vervet Ubuntu 15.04 Makes Its Debut

Lots of under the hood changes and a snappy debut. Ubuntu 15.04 debuted this week marking the first milestone update for Ubuntu in 2015. Ubuntu 15.04 is 'just a regular release and as such will only be supported for nine months.

Worlds smallest i.MX6 module has onboard WiFi, eMMC

Variscite unveiled a 50 x 20mm “DART-MX6? module that runs Linux or Android on the Freescale i.MX6, with up to 64GB eMMC flash and -40 to 85°C support. Variscite’s claim that the 50 x 20mm DART-MX6 is the world’s smallest computer-on-module based on Freescale’s i.MX6 system-on-chip appears to be a valid one. It beats the smallest ones we’ve seen to date: TechNexion’s 40 x 36mm PICO-IMX6, and Solid-Run’s 47 x 30mm microSOM i4. It’s also just a hair larger than Variscite’s own 52 x 17mm DART-4460, which is based on a dual-core TI OMAP4460 SoC, and Gumstix’s slightly larger 58 x 17mm Overo modules, which use TI Sitara AM37xx SoCs.

Rugged Pico-ITX SBC offers dual GbE, drives dual displays

Like Seco’s recent ?Q7-BT-J Qseven module, the new SECOpITX-BT SBC supports Intel’s Atom E3800 system-on-chips. In this case, you can run Linux or Windows on the full product range, from the single-core, 1.46GHz Atom E3815 (5W TDP) to the quad-core, 1.91GHz E3845 (10W). There are also a number of dual-core options including the fairly new 1.33GHz E3805 model, which lacks a GPU or support for Intel Burst mode or Hyper-Treading, and runs at a low 3 Watts.

Play for Me, Jarvis

Elon Musk is known to be particularly apprehensive about artificial intelligence. Although many of us are both excited and worried about the potential future of AI, most don't need to fear computers taking over in the creative realms of society.

Or do we?

Android-based eyewear woos runners and cyclists

Recon Instruments announced some basic specs and photos of the Recon Jet back in Nov. 2013 when it announced its $399 Snow2 heads-up display (HUD) designed to fit inside a pair of ski goggles. The much delayed sportswear computer runs essentially the same Android-based ReconOS 4 firmware as the Snow2. The Jet offers an “open platform and SDK” for app development, and uses the Snow2’s Recon Engage community site for uploading photos and videos and downloading apps.

10 years of Git, an Open Business Models Initiative, and more news

  • Opensource.com; By Joshua Allen Holm (Posted by Scott_Ruecker on Apr 10, 2015 4:48 PM EDT)
  • Story Type: News Story
In this week's open source news roundup, we take a look at 10 years of Git, an Open Business Models Initiative, library open source software, and more!

Designing Foils with XFLR5

For any object moving through a fluid, forces are applied to the object as the fluid moves around it. A fluid can be something like water, or even something like the air around us. When the object is specifically designed to maximize the forces that the fluid can apply, you can designate these designs as airfoils. A more common name that most people would use is a wing. The shape of a wing, or airfoil, determines the forces that are applied to it when it moves through a fluid or the air. These forces also depend on the speed of motion through the fluid and the direction of flow around the airfoil.

NASAs Chris Mattmann on Apache technology

Chris Mattmann is a frequent speaker at ApacheCon North America and has a wealth of experience in software design, and the construction of large-scale data-intensive systems. His work has infected a broad set of communities, ranging from helping NASA unlock data from its next generation of earth science system satellites, to assisting graduate students at the University of Southern California (his alma mater) in the study of software architecture, all the way to helping industry and open source as a member of the Apache Software Foundation (ASF). When he's not busy being busy, he's spending time with his lovely wife and son, braving the mean streets of Southern California.

Whats your favorite conference swag?

Conference season is here. And, with it comes a barrage of swag just waiting to find its way to bottom of our bags or a pile on the top of our desks. But we love our swag, don't we? We redistribute it later to friends and collegues we think could really use another sticker for their laptop or another T-shirt for their T-shirt drawer. Maybe another water bottle for all those hot summer days ahead or an umbrella shant we get caught in the rain! Oh, and the beloved collector's item, the lanyard. How they grow and heave wherever they might collect year over year of our attendance to conferences far and wide.

Google open-sources Santa Claus

Google has open-sourced Santa Claus. Or at least the code for its online Santa Tracker. For those of you who are more “bah humbug” than “pass the eggnog”, Santa Tracker offers an online method of tracking Santa's fictional progress through the logistical chore of stuffing soon-to-be-ignored amusing plastic tat down the chimneys of the world's best-fed and most-privileged children.

« Previous ( 1 ... 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 ... 1021 ) Next »