Showing headlines posted by brideoflinux

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Wanted: GNU Project Maintainers

Would you like to give Linux a boost by contributing your coding skills in the service of a GNU project? Here’s a partial list of some projects that are looking for a little help.

AWS No Longer a Holdout, Joins Kubernetes Group

Now that the last major public cloud provider has joined CNCF, expect Kubernetes to become the de facto container orchestration standard.

Where Has FOSS Force Been?

The last time I wrote anything for FOSS Force was back on May 11. What the heck happened? A couple of things, starting with blindness.

What's New in RHEL 7.4

These days when a new version of an operating system is released, there's usually not a lot of gee-whiz new whistles and bells to make the front office folks salivate -- especially if it's a point release. But there are still plenty of new features to make DevOps folks happy -- nuts and bolts stuff that makes everybody's life easier.

Kite Dev Tool Drops Atom Bomb

You don't tug on Superman's cape, you don't spit into the wind, and you don't mess around with an open source toolkit. There's trouble in open source land, revolving around a text editor that's popular with developers and a proprietary toolset, Kite, that wants some of that open source business. Their way of getting it, however, seems to have backfired.

Microsoft Backs Kubernetes with Cloud Native Membership

It's happened again. Microsoft has joined yet another open source group. Whatever happened to Redmond's long held belief that open source is a cancer? Times change, and evidently Microsoft has learned to change with them.

'Devil's Ivy' Is Another Wake-Up Call for IoT Security

Although many media outlets have been quick to blame the open source practice of code reuse on the scope of this exploit, that ignores the core issue. The real problem is the lack of standards -- especially when it comes to security -- for IoT devices.

GoDaddy Drops Curtain on Its Cloud Business… Again

GoDaddy is shuttering Cloud Servers, its public cloud service. I know what you’re thinking. “GoDaddy is in the public cloud business?” Therein might lie the problem.

Red Hat Updates OpenShift Online Developers' Platform

Last week Red Hat introduced its new and improved version of Red Hat OpenShift Online, its platform as a service cloud offering. It comes in a free or paid version, both hosted on AWS. If my experience is any indication, however, you might have to stand in line for a while in order to take the free version for a ride.

Hyperledger Fabric Blockchain Ready for Prime Time

Although 16 months or so might seem like a long time, I'm surprised the developers rolled it out the door this quickly. Blockchain is pretty much uncharted territory, and although the technology has already been put to use by some early adopters, the potential for the technology is greatly unexplored.

The Many Loves of Richard M. Stallman

Here’s a blast from the past. A tale about RMS from back in the days when Roblimo was young — younger than he is now at least — and Stallman was…well, Stallman.

Why Is Open Source Important to You?

While watching this video called “Why Is Open Source Important to Us,” we suddenly found ourselves wondering why it’s important to you.

Open Security Controller Waiting for Developer Interest

On June 28, the Linux Foundation announced the Open Security Controller Project for the orchestration and automation of software-defined network security functions used to protect east-west traffic within data centers. It's not a new project, Intel has been working on it for some time, and made it the subject of a presentation at February's security focused RSA Conference in San Francisco.

LinkedIn's New Open Source Apps Should Get Quick DevOps Uptake

LinkedIn has announced the release of two applications under open source licenses that should be of interest to DevOps.

GitHub's Advice to 'Ask What You Can Do for Open Source'

If you're a developer -- especially if you or your organization uses open source software -- GitHub has a potential answer to the question JFK would have you ask. You can pledge time to contribute to open source projects. It won't cost you anything but time, and you'll get to use your skills for the greater good.

Six Things to Do to Secure Your Linux System

Because Petya only chased after Windows, in typical but understandable knee-jerk fashion, the media has been full of stories on how to secure Windows servers and workstations, not only against Petya but best security practices to protect against the next, as yet unknown, threat. Linux admins, meanwhile, are most likely breathing a sigh of relief and made content by the fact they're using the invincible other operating system.

Beneath Red Hat's and Oracle's Earnings Reports

A look at what Red Hat is selling to raise its bottom line offers some insight into what's going on in IT these days. Most of the company's income, 88 percent of the total, came from subscriptions revolving around RHEL and its related technologies. Ansible, a DevOps automation engine that's often used with Kubernetes deployments, was big, responsible for six of the quarter's transactions of over $1 million. This included one deal valued at over $5 million -- "our largest deal ever for Ansible," according to Shander.

5.5 Million Devices Operating with WannaCry Port Open

Although the Linux machines running Samba can’t be targeted by EternalBlue, the exploit believed to have been developed by the NSA upon which WannaCry is based, they’re not entirely safe either. Since late May, all versions of Samba released since 2010 have been vulnerable to an exploit called SambaCry in which a hacker can upload a shared library to a writable share and then cause the server to load and execute it.

Time to Patch: 'Stack Clash' Vulnerability Affects Wide Range of Unix-like OSes

  • IT Pro; By Time to Patch: 'Stack Clash' Vulnerability Affects Wide Range of Unix-like OSes (Posted by brideoflinux on Jun 20, 2017 1:51 PM EDT)
  • Story Type: News Story, Security; Groups: Linspire
There's a new exploit in town that affects a variety of Unix-like operating systems, including Linux, OpenBSD, NetBSD, FreeBSD and Solaris running on 32-bit and 64-bit x86. According to Qualys, which discovered the flaw, other operating systems and architectures may also be vulnerable as well, but haven't been researched yet. Evidently the exploit was discovered back in May but wasn't made public until Monday to enable devs and vendors time to develop patches, which are now available

Getting Started with Open Source Licenses

To get started understanding the ins and outs of open source licensing, it's important to understand the differences between "permissive" and "copyleft" licensing.

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