Showing headlines posted by brideoflinux

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VMWare's Dirk Hohndel on Linux and Open Source Software

Which came first, the chicken or the egg? Ask the same question about Linux and open source software and the answer is clear — but still a surprise to some.

Mesosphere Extends DC/OS to the EDGE, Adds Multi-Cloud, Kubernetes Support

With today's release, users of DC/OS will be be able to not only treat multiple machines as one -- but will be able to bring devices at the edge as well as multiple clouds to the platform's pane of glass.

IBM's Phil Estes on the Turbulent Waters of Container History

Phil Estes painted a different picture of container history at Open Source 101 in Raleigh last weekend, speaking from the perspective of someone who had a front row seat. To hear him tell it, this rise and success is a story filled with intrigue, and enough drama to keep a daytime soap opera going for a season or two.

Open Source 101: A Beginner's Way to Learn Open Source

Enterprise level open source conferences, and conferences centered around single open source projects, are a great way to learn open source -- with one caveat. Most conferences don't offer much for those new to open source. Most workshops are for folks who are already working in the field and who are attending the conference to increase their skill sets. There might be a few entry level workshops on open source business models or licensing issues, but the vast majority of technical workshops are designed for folks who already have hands-on experience.

Is Open Source RISC-V Ready to Take on Intel, AMD, and ARM in the Data Center?

Open source startup SiFive introduces a single board computer running Linux on the open RISC-V architecture. Is the data center next?

Heptio's Craig McLuckie On Kubernetes Orchestration's Start at Google

I think one of the things that was clear to us right from the get go is that for it to really succeed and achieve its full potential it had to be legitimately open. It couldn't be something where we inside Google just held on to every line of control, because ultimately that would limit its applicability to its use on Google. For it to become something that was widely and richly embraced by the community, it had to be a legitimately open technology.

Why Mainframes Aren't Going Away Any Time Soon

Modern mainframes definitely aren't your father's punch card-driven machines that filled entire rooms. These days, they most often run Linux and have found a renewed place in the data center, where they're being called upon to do a lot of heavy lifting. Want to know where the largest instance of Oracle's database runs? It's on a Linux mainframe. How about the largest implementation of SAP on the planet? Again, Linux on a mainframe.

New Open Source Project Takes Aim at XenServer

Although XenServer has found a substantial user base, it's never really seen much of a developer community form around it. Most development still comes from Citrix, which retains skin in the game from its commercial support program and from its paid version of the platform containing features not available in the free version. The failure to attract a healthy developer community isn't surprising, because open source developers often have an aversion to projects using such an "open core" business model.

Did Red Hat Just Spend $250 Million on Free Software?

These new teams of employees, which includes CoreOS's founder and CEO Alex Polvi and CTO Brandon Philips, will be doing some of the heavy lifting as the technology they developed is rolled into Red Hat brands. They will continue to work out of CoreOS offices in San Francisco, New York City, and Berlin.

Linux Monitoring Tool Detects Meltdown Attacks

The security company SentinelOne has released a free-to-use monitoring tool that will alert when attackers attempt to exploit the Meltdown vulnerability.

Data Center Network Software Startup Cumulus Raises $43M

Cumulus is credited with developing the first Linux operating system for data center network hardware. Over the last four years the company has partnered with Dell, Hewlett Packard Enterprise, and Mellanox to bring its operating system to their network switches.

Microsoft Shields Azure Stack Hybrid Cloud Users from Patent Trolls

Azure hopes its expansion of open source patent protection to include on-premises as well as cloud use will help efforts to attract enterprise customers.

Red Hat: We Didn't Pull CPU Microcode Update to Pass the Buck

Red Hat got into a bit of a PR snafu this week after it pulled from distribution a CPU microcode update meant to address the Spectre Variant 2 CPU design flaw. The Register, the tech news site that broke the story about the Meltdown and Spectre vulnerabilities in processors earlier this month, characterized the move as Red Hat washing its hands of the responsibility to provide customers with firmware patches to address the vulnerability by instructing them to get firmware updates from their hardware vendors instead.

GitHub Alternative SourceForge Vies for Comeback with Redesigned Site

SourceForge, tired of being the forgotten GitHub alternative, has been busy redesigning its website. Normally such a cosmetic solution might seem a little underwhelming -- the phrase "putting lipstick on a pig" comes to mind -- but in this case it's a necessary step in the site's efforts to return to relevance, especially in light of changes that have already been made.

WP Engine Gets $250 Million Funding from Silver Lake

It might be called the little engine that could -- or maybe the little engine that does. Whatever you call it, Austin, Texas based WP Engine web hosting company just got a big payoff with a $250 million investment from the private equity giant Silver Lake partners.

Critical CSRF Security Vulnerability in phpMyAdmin Database Tool Patched

If you've got MySQL or MariaDB running on any of your machines -- and you probably do -- then there's a good chance you're also running phpMyAdmin, a popular free and open source MySQL administration tool. That means you might have a problem.

How Red Hat Is Dealing With the Spectre of the CPU Meltdown

Those reading media accounts published Wednesday and Thursday are probably under the impression that while Spectre affects Intel, AMD and ARM CPUs, that Meltdown affects only Intel products -- or perhaps all Intel CPUs and some ARM chips. Not so, says Red Hat's Jon Masters. Both vulnerabilities are basically architecture agnostic.

Five Linux Server Distributions to Consider in 2018

Contrary to some beliefs, Linux distros are rarely just carbon copies of other distros. As is evident in this look at five of the most popular Linux server distributions, each is different, with distinct strengths and weaknesses.

Eelo: Gaël Duval’s Open Source, Privacy Respecting Android Phone Clone

Are you ready for a new operating system for your Android phone? An operating system that's totally free and that's main purpose isn't to get you to consume? How about an operating system that, although based on Android, brings to the table some of the best aspects of Linux -- like (eventually) it's own repository of apps? Well, get ready, Gaël Duval is working to bring eelo to the table.

Open Source Software Is a 2017 Success Story

As 2017 draws to a close, we look at some of the reasons why the use of open source software is growing and will continue to grow in the year ahead.

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