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EVE Online to Linux

CCP Games, one of the world’s largest independent game developers, today announced a partnership with TransGaming Inc., a leading developer of software portability products for the electronic entertainment industry. The strategic relationship will enable CCP to deliver its popular massively multiplayer online game (MMOG), EVE Online, with Linux and Macintosh platforms later this year.

The RPM Fusion Project

The Dribble, Freshrpms and Livna teams, already joined by some Fedora contributors, are proud to announce the RPM Fusion project. RPM Fusion aims to bring together many packagers from various 3rd party repos and build a single add-on repository for Fedora and Red Hat Enterprise Linux. We aim to provide support for all 'current' versions of Fedora including devel, for i386, ppc, ppc64 and x86_64.

IBM and OpenOffice.org: An Interview with IBM's Doug Heintzman

Yesterday, OpenOffice.org announced that IBM would become a formal – and substantial - contributor to that organization. But press release was brief, as was an FAQ that was only available at the OpenOffice site for a few hours. As a result, I got in touch with IBM to see if I could interview someone to learn more, and was able to spend a half an hour on the phone with Doug Heintzman, the Director of Strategy for the Lotus division at IBM, someone who knows how the decision was made, and what the future may hold.

Office software shootout: OpenOffice.org Writer vs. Micosoft Word, round three

Every few years, I check in on how OpenOffice.org Writer compares to Microsoft Word. The first comparison came in 2002, the second in 2005. In those two comparisons, OpenOffice.org emerged as superior, not least for its greater stability. With Microsoft Office 2007 now out for six months and OpenOffice.org 2.3 about to be released, what's the situation today? To find out, I compared the two programs on the tools that most intermediate to advanced users are likely to use.

GPLM: AcerMed is Officially Dead

According to GPLMedicine.org and a company letter,AcerMed is officially dead. Fred Trotter opines:"The important thing to note here is what did NOT matter. The AcerMed people seemed decent enough: did not matter. AcerMed was CCHIT certified: did not matter. AcerMed was recommended in the industry press and by industry experts: did not matter. Companies get sued, people get sick. When will the medical community wake up to the fact that proprietary medical software is incompatible with medicine, incompatible with free thought and dangerous to patient data?"

Minister champions open source endeavour

South Africa's minister of public services, Geraldine Fraser-Moleketi, this week accepted an invitation to be a patron of FOSSFA. On her acceptance, Fraser-Moleketi emphasised that she did not want to be a figurehead for an inactive structure, but rather wanted to be involved with something that was going somewhere. Tectonic spoke to FOSSFA to find out what the foundation has planned.

Interview: Mark Shuttleworth on KDE, Rosetta, and OpenXML

Mark Shuttleworth talks about about success, failure, and the lessons he has learned. He gives his thoughts on Linux gaming, KDE vs. Gnome in Ubuntu, Microsoft's patent deals, the OpenXML format, and tivoization. From the interview: ' I'm strongly encouraging KDE to adopt the same release schedule as Gnome, because I think they would become more widely tested and more widely adopted if they did this.'

All systems go for validation of updated OpenSSL module

When the Open Source Software Institute (OSSI) sought Federal Information Processing Standards (FIPS) 140-2 validation for its OpenSSL toolkit last year, it was anything but smooth sailing. In fact, the whole process took so long that by the time it eventually wound its way through the validation process, it was already technically outdated. OSSI has just submitted a new OpenSSL update for FIPS validation but, according to Executive Director John Weathersby, things are bound to go much more smoothly this time around.

Is .NET on GNU/Linux a Trojan Horse?

A take on the dialog regarding the strategic risks involved with the increased proliferation of .NET and Mono based software in GNU/Linux under the banner of Microsoft-Novell patent deal.

Implementing quotas to restrict disk space usage

If you manage a system that's accessed by multiple users, you might have a user who hogs the disk space. Using disk quotas you can limit the amount of space available to each user. It's fairly easy to set up quotas, and once you are done you will be able to control the number of inodes and blocks owned by any user or group. Control over the disk blocks means that you can specify exactly how many bytes of disk space are available to a user or group. Since inodes store information about files, by limiting the number of inodes, you can limit the number of files users can create.

Novell Attempts to Defend Moonlight, But Sinks Deeper in the Mud

Novell was not pleased with our understanding of Moonlight, but its rebuttal failed to impress. Worse — it only confirmed and reaffirmed most of our suspicions. It even introduced new serious issues. "Using Moonlight, Silverlight will run on any Linux distro supported by Mono, which is most of the major distros. It’s true that, under the terms of our agreements with Microsoft, only SUSE Linux Enterprise will be able to bundle Moonlight into the distribution."

Linux Done Right: A user’s pleasant surprise

I initially spoke with John Flores, a system administrator with the University of Texas at San Antonio, earlier this year for a broad SearchEnterpriseLinux.com article on Linux support. The article focused on the good, the bad and the ugly of working with commercial Linux distributors, as well as with the alternatives like CentOS and Debian. Flores sampled the server side of Xandros’ offering, Xandros Server, and saw that the vendor’s strategy was geared towards users who wanted to migrate from Windows with as little a learning curve as possible. He was hooked. Windows didn’t stand a chance.

[Whatever you think of Xandros, it's better than running Windows :-) – Sander]

Canadian company nails concept of public computing

I spent some time this week playing with and learning about the concept of public computing -- computers placed in public locations, primarily for accessing the Internet. There is a Canadian company that has really nailed the whole concept. Userful Corp. out of Calgary (www.userful.com) has a product called the Discover Station, a Linux-based computer that is designed from the ground up for public computing.

Open Source Programmers, Developers to Hold First Power Powwow

Power.Org will sponsor the first Power Architecture Developer Conference in the Austin Convention Center September 24-25. The vendor-neutral convention will gather Power.org's corporate members with developers, hardware and software solution providers, academics and designers to show how open collaboration can break down barriers to innovation. The two-day event will include technical sessions, hands-on labs, keynote addresses and vendor demonstrations.

IBM beats Microsoft over the head with its own code

IBM added a delicious twist on its new commitment to help OpenOffice.org battle Microsoft Office by donating code that was originally derived in part from a Microsoft-developed technology. IBM’s iAccessible2, code-named Project Missouri, is a specification for technology used to help the visually impaired interact with Open Document Format (ODF)-compliant applications and was developed in part using Microsoft Active Accessibility (MAA) as a starting point.

Sun accommodating Linux in Solaris

With an incremental update to its Solaris 10 OS, Sun is extending the platform's virtualization capabilities to accommodate Linux and Solaris on the same computer. Sun will add to the Solaris Containers capability, which has bolstered server usage by allowing for multiple instances of Solaris on the same server, said Dan Roberts, Sun director of marketing for Solaris. With Solaris 10 8/07, being announced Tuesday, users can run Red Hat Enterprise Linux, CentOS Linux, and Linux applications via Solaris Containers for Linux Applications.

Terra Soft Carries the Torch for Cell and Power Platforms

Since launching Yellow Dog Linux for the Playstation 3 (PS3) last year, Terra Soft has been busy expanding its presence in the Cell processor ecosystem. To get an update about what the company has been doing, we contacted Terra Soft's CEO Kai Staats via email in Nakuru, Kenya. Staats is there working with the Pistis Orphanage & Academy to complete some important projects for the children's home and school.

More Google Phone Rumors: Hello Linux Edition

Five fresh rumors have arisen surrounding the secretive Google Phone, but unfortunately none point toward a potential release date. The most interesting rumor is that the Google Phone will not be running on Windows Mobile like all over HTC-produced smartphones and Pocket PC Phones. Instead, it will get treated to a Linux system similar to that offered on certain Motorola phones.

Windows, Linux vie for honours

The energy efficiency battle between Linux and Windows is intensifying, with each claiming to be better at cutting power consumption and avoiding environmental damage. The Linux Foundation has already clarified its plans to bring improved power management to the operating system through its Green Linux Initiative. The working group is making it easy for kernel developers, hardware manufacturers, system vendors, distributions and end users to collaborate on the requirements for more effective power management in Linux.

How-To: Switch Your Grandma to Linux

  • MadPenguin.org; By Matt Hartley (Posted by gsh on Sep 11, 2007 6:27 AM EDT)
  • Story Type: Editorial; Groups: Linux
I've said it before, with the proper support in place, anyone can use certain Linux distributions successfully. And apparently, this has been shown to be true yet again. But even considering this success story, there remains a shortage of understanding on which dial-up modems will work and why, if that new all-in-one printer grandma just purchased will work with her chosen distribution and so on.

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