Happy 20th anniversary, Slackware!

Forum: LinuxTotal Replies: 21
Author Content
gus3

Jul 17, 2013
3:47 PM EST
Twenty years ago yesterday, the memo went out. And roughly four years later, it became my introduction to PC-based *nix.
mbaehrlxer

Jul 17, 2013
11:15 PM EST
i remember coming back from summer travels, finding out that slackware was the new and improved SLS. as SLS was no longer developed for a while i believed it was the same thing just with a new name.

the version number 1.0 may also have something to do with it. both debian and redhat didn't show up on my radar until years later...

greetings, eMBee.
kikinovak

Jul 18, 2013
4:03 PM EST
Wrote a little hagiography for the occasion.

http://www.kikinovak.net/index.php?post/2013/06/10/Ten-reaso...

Enjoy!
BernardSwiss

Jul 19, 2013
12:17 AM EST
"Hagiography"?

Now that's what I call a fan-boy ;-)
kikinovak

Jul 19, 2013
4:42 AM EST
Sorry. My initial studies (literature & classical philology) shining through :o)
Steven_Rosenber

Jul 20, 2013
1:42 PM EST
It's quite amazing how Slackware has continued for all of these years. It's probably the best way to experience KDE.
Bob_Robertson

Jul 29, 2013
9:11 AM EST
It's wonderful when people use English well. Thank you, Kiki.
gus3

Jul 29, 2013
4:11 PM EST
I thought the word "hagiography" was totally Greek.
Bob_Robertson

Jul 30, 2013
8:01 AM EST
English does not borrow from other languages.

English lurks in dark alleys, and mugs other languages, rifling their pockets for loose grammar.
dag

Aug 04, 2013
7:33 PM EST
is not english decended from latin. all terms or words are just baseless until they are defined. all words are created language is created. a word in another language usually has its equivelent in other languages. some times words need to be defined with multible words to define it correctly especially in english with its limited ability to define multi meaning terms this is only with translation have you though until it can be incorporated and defined natively just like computing;)
gus3

Aug 04, 2013
7:39 PM EST
Ummm...

English gets most of its grammar from Latin, but its vocabulary comes from everywhere except Antarctica.
dag

Aug 04, 2013
8:09 PM EST
verey true
DrGeoffrey

Aug 04, 2013
8:11 PM EST
I dunno, we borrowed a mascot from there. Can we really be certain we did not borrow some words from the Penguins, too?
dag

Aug 04, 2013
8:18 PM EST
a word is only a word until it is defined. lol has become a word albiet an anogram.

Edit: this has gotten way off topic.
BernardSwiss

Aug 04, 2013
9:12 PM EST
My understanding is that English origins were from Germanic languages (Angle, Saxon, etc), with a later (11th Century) infusion of romance languages (including Latin) when that "frenchie" (France didn't exist, yet) William the Conqueror crossed the Channel and took over in 1066 (a little incident during the Norman Conquest now remembered as the Battle of Hastings).

(That's why its "beef" or "pork" if its on your dinner table, but "cow" or "pig" if you're taking care of the livestock).
jdixon

Aug 04, 2013
9:27 PM EST
> ..is not english decended from latin.

BernardSwiss is correct. English is a germanic language. We borrowed a lot from both Latin and French (which is descended from Latin), so there is a lot of Latin influence, but at it's core it's closer to German than Latin.

> ...this has gotten way off topic.

With a BDFL named Vokerding, how can a discussion of germanic languages be off topic? :)
dag

Aug 04, 2013
10:31 PM EST
I do stand corrected.
kikinovak

Aug 05, 2013
10:54 AM EST
Most modern languages can "import" words from latin and/or greek to form new words and actually do so quite extensively. Sometimes a word can stem from both latin and greek, like "television" (from "telos" and "visio"). The word "hagiography" is a simple composite of "hagios" (greek for "saint") and "graphein" (greek for "write").

Keep It Simple Stupid :o)
gus3

Aug 05, 2013
11:09 AM EST
And "hagios" itself is derived from two Greek parts: "ha-" (not) and "gios" (earthly). In other words, "not of this world."
cr

Aug 05, 2013
11:15 AM EST
UiO linguist makes sensational claim: English is a Scandinavian language
notbob

Aug 05, 2013
4:35 PM EST
I don't know about all this other stuff. Recall a documentary about languages and was shocked at how many everyday words we use that came from French. Anyway, jes like to say Happy B-day to Slackware. Loved it from the minute I started using it 13 yrs ago and can't imagine changing to anything else. I may get into VMs of other distros, but not gonna abandon my fave, Slackware. Happy 20th birthday!!
mbaehrlxer

Aug 05, 2013
11:06 PM EST
cr: funny, scandinavian languages (except finnish) are germanic too. noone claimed that english is based on german specifically. they are all in one family, except that english has more romanic (french, latin) influence than other germanic languages.

just look at who conquered parts of england and pushed the anglo-saxons back.

nothing to see here. move along...

greetings, eMBee.

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