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OOo Off the Wall: The Elephant in the Living Room -- OOo and MS Office

A look at how the OOo project balances being similar to MS Office with maintaining its unique, better features.

Where is the Cluster? Microsoft HPC at SC05

  • http://www.clustermonkey.net/; By Douglas Eadline (Posted by VISITOR on Feb 6, 2006 8:49 AM EDT)
  • Story Type: Editorial; Groups: Community
I'm sitting in the overflow room for the Bill Gates Keynote at Supercomputing '05 (SC05). Odd, his talk is being given in a medium sized room, I am told they have bigger rooms in the convention center. Ah, but why risk empty seats. First, let me say how bazaar this is. Bill Gates at SC, like the CEO of Pepsi addressing the Coke shareholders meeting, no it is worse, it is like Terrel Owens explaining the word humble to the Dali Lama. The term non sequitur comes to mind.

Microsoft has a problem says maddog

  • IT Wire Australia; By Stan Beer (Posted by tadelste on Feb 6, 2006 7:52 AM EDT)
According to maddog, Linux is becoming a more attractive alternative for the desktop and the key driver is the need for Microsoft to keep pumping its new products into the market.

“People will be going through a big change with the (Microsoft) Vista project. There’s a lot of people who are still on Windows 95 and 98 and moving from that to Vista is going to be a big move. It will require new hardware but some of their hardware is still viable in the Linux space so instead of going to Vista they’ll go to Linux.

Taking On the Database Giants

Can open-source upstarts compete with Oracle, IBM, and Microsoft? It's an uphill battle, but customers are starting to look at the alternatives

Open-source mobile server adds push email to challenge BlackBerry et al

  • PC Pro; By Matt Whipp (Posted by tadelste on Feb 6, 2006 7:27 AM EDT)
The makers of an open-source implementation of push email are hoping to leap-frog the patent-embroiled likes of RIM, Good Technology and Microsoft with this latest version of its product.

Fedora Weekly News Issue 32

Welcome to our issue number 32 of Fedora Weekly News.

Linux's Life Beyond Servers

  • InformationWeek; By Johanna Ambrosio (Posted by tadelste on Feb 6, 2006 6:30 AM EDT)
  • Story Type: News Story; Groups:
An InformationWeek survey of 354 business-technology professionals finds that many already are expanding their use of open-source software into new application areas and even to the desktop. The low cost of Linux continues to be the big adoption driver; the operating system's performance and reliability are increasingly seen as pluses. But issues such as compatibility with the Microsoft world, potential security weaknesses, and the lack of Linux skills among IT workers stand in the way.

Nearly 60% of those surveyed are using Linux and other open-source software on servers, up from 49% just a year ago. More surprising, 35% also use open-source software on desktop PCs, with another 18% pilot-testing such desktop software and another 10% planning to try it this year.

Cape Town to respond to disasters using Asterisk

  • Tectonic.co.za; By Richard Frank (Posted by dcparris on Feb 6, 2006 5:14 AM EDT)
  • Story Type: News Story
An emergency management centre in Cape Town will soon be using open source VOIP telephony to deal with and respond to disasters in the region. The implementation of the Asterisk-based call-handling system by local VOIP gurus, Connection Telecom, points towards growing open source use in critical applications.

Fon time

Fon has been around for awhile. Which is to say, three months. The Spain-based brainchild ofMartin Varsavsky, it's a global community of people who share WiFi connections. Also a business. And it's about to get a lot bigger, because Google, Skype and Sequoia Capital have justinvested $21.7 million in it. And if you're a"Linus", a"Bill", or even an"Alien", you get to benefit too. Or that's the idea, anyway.

Comment of the Day - February 6, 2006 - I use Xandros 3.0.2

When we asked the question: What Linux Distribution do you use as a desktop? We received an overwhelming response. In a short time, a question posed to LXer readers generated unparalleled activity on our site and on other sites around the globe. We now have several hundred replies we can use to create a statistical model to project Linux desktop use.

We also will feature comments from the forum posts such as Rajiv's. He makes a compelling case for his favorite distribution. You can find all the posts in our Linux Meta Forum. Thank you.

DistroWatch Weekly: NLD 10, Ubuntu distro sprint, smart-urpmi, Gentoo at E-Trade, "Goomours"

  • DistroWatch.com; By Ladislav Bodnar (Posted by dave on Feb 6, 2006 3:05 AM EDT)
  • Story Type: Newsletter
Welcome to this year's sixth issue of DistroWatch Weekly! With all eyes on the final stages of development of Fedora Core 5 and SUSE Linux 10.1, other distributions are not resting either; we bring you interesting information about the upcoming releases of Novell Linux Desktop 10 and Kubuntu 6.04. Interested in network security and penetration testing? The brand new BackTrack live CD provides an amazing collection of tools just for this purpose; we'll take a quick look at the first beta released over the weekend. Also in this issue: try the new smart-urpmi for Mandriva and read how a vice president of a large financial firm fell in love with Gentoo. Finally, our January donation, the largest DistroWatch.com has ever made, goes to Gambas and Krusader. Happy reading! Join us at irc.freenode.net #distrowatch

Software promises open source management

The OpenQRM project is being hosted on SourceForge.net and distributed under a modified Mozilla Public License. The software is available for free download. Qlusters will generate revenue by offering support packages, starting at US$750 per server, per year. Add-ons, such as support for VMware, will bump the cost of OpenQRM to about $1,250 per server, per year, says Ofer Shoshan, founder and CEO of Qlusters.

French Police Moving From Internet Explorer to Mozilla's Firefox

Paris, France (AHN) - In a move that stunned those supportive of open sourcing for computers, officials announced that French police will convert their 70,000 desktops to Mozilla's Firefox browser, abandoning Microsoft's Internet Explorer.

IBM Offers Free Software, Technical Resources to Russian Developers

IBM has announced free software and educational resources to help developers in Russia build and deploy innovative applications based on open standards and open source. The company is giving software developers, architects and students in Russia free access to software and hundreds of new tools and technical and educational resources that will enable them to easily build open standards-based applications.

Do-It Yourself Computing 2: Packages

  • OfB.biz: Open for Business; By Ed Hurst (Posted by dcparris on Feb 6, 2006 12:48 AM EDT)
  • Story Type: Tutorial
In Linux Land, distributions are often divided into categories based on how they manage software. It's more than just keeping track of what is installed, but what version. The obvious issue is security updates. Software is usually offered in packages. Sometimes they are all self-contained; often there are packages which depend on others. These dependencies usually make sense, but not always.

Centeris wants VARs to sell cross-platform suite

  • IT Week UK; By Trevor Treharne (Posted by tadelste on Feb 6, 2006 12:19 AM EDT)
  • Story Type: News Story
Server management vendor Centeris is looking for UK channel partners keen to make Linux and Windows work together. Centeris provides a cross-platform suite for managing Linux and Windows servers and hopes to boost business for resellers working with either vendor.

World Cup sparks new technology

  • LinuxWorld AU; By John Blau, IDG News Service (Posted by tadelste on Feb 5, 2006 11:22 PM EDT)
  • Story Type: News Story
The antennas are linked to a high-speed fiber optic ring, which routes data to a cluster of Linux-based servers.

Universities switch on high-power computing projects

  • LinuxWorld AU; By Todd R. Weiss (Posted by tadelste on Feb 5, 2006 10:25 PM EDT)
  • Story Type: News Story
After doing research for years using computer clusters, Iowa State University has a high-performance supercomputer running to decipher the corn genome. Meanwhile, Georgia Institute of Technology deepened its high-performance computing relationship with the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL).

Buffalo Technology TeraStation Pro 1.0 TB

  • TrustedReviews (Posted by tadelste on Feb 5, 2006 9:28 PM EDT)
  • Story Type: Reviews
Buffalo Technology set the entry-level NAS world alight when it launched the TeraStation last year. This smart little box stuffed everything else on the market by delivering a full Terabyte (TB) of network storage at a price no-one else could even come close to. Well, it’s done it again with the TeraStation Pro. This desktop appliance also delivers masses of low-cost storage but goes one step beyond its predecessor by adding improved hard disk swap capabilities.

Xara gives Adobe a run for its money

  • News&Observer; By Paul Gilster (Posted by tadelste on Feb 5, 2006 8:30 PM EDT)
  • Story Type: News Story
Because I like small, gutsy companies that are willing to take on the big guys, a graphics outfit Xara caught my eye....But it goes toe to toe against Adobe Illustrator, the $500 heavyweight widely considered a standard. You compete against industry titans on two obvious levels, one of them being price. Xara Xtreme sells for $79 yet offers composition and editing tools that stand out in the rapidly growing vector graphics field. And if low price can improve its market share, Xara is getting more aggressive still with the announcement that it will convert its products to an open source format and make them freely available to Linux developers (a Mac OS X version also looms).

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