Too much Ubuntu..?

Forum: LinuxTotal Replies: 34
Author Content
stefragre

Mar 22, 2011
4:39 PM EST
Na. just kidding with that subject line. I am an avowed Ubuntu fan. No other distro, except Fedora, can come close. I like and have used SUSE/openSUSE as well. But Novell.. One could argue Canonical one way or the other. But so far they have kept open source open. And you got to respect Mr Shuttleworth a man of his word. As for all those remixs popping up.? Copy cats are flattering. and appeal to the less ambitious converts to the Linux world. As for me, the basic Ubuntu is all I need. There's so much that can be done, a little work and its yours.

Tell me, who agrees/diagrees
gus3

Mar 22, 2011
4:50 PM EST
...must bite tongue...

...must bite tongue...
tuxchick

Mar 22, 2011
5:15 PM EST
Nom, tongue for lunch. Chewy and cold, yet strangely tasty.
gus3

Mar 22, 2011
5:33 PM EST
My tongue isn't cold. I haven't stuck it out at anyone in ages.
tracyanne

Mar 22, 2011
5:37 PM EST
Quoting:I haven't stuck it out at anyone in ages.


I had to read that 3 times before I realised you had said "out at".
jdixon

Mar 22, 2011
6:24 PM EST
> No other distro, except Fedora, can come close.

Really? In exactly what way is Ubuntu so superior to other distros? Enquiring minds want to know.
jacog

Mar 23, 2011
1:57 AM EST
If Ubuntu is so great, then why... grargh... ok no, not going to go there...

Ubuntu vs. world KDE4 vs. world mono vs world

... we've gone these places - it took our shoes away and we had to walk across volcanic wastelands only to arrive nowhere at all.
jdixon

Mar 23, 2011
9:25 AM EST
> ...ok no, not going to go there...

You'll notice I phrased my question in a positive manner, jacog. :)

But I really would like to know exactly what I can do in Ubuntu that I can't do, sometimes with greater or lesser difficulty admittedly, in most other distros. What exactly does the writer think makes Ubuntu so much better than Debain, Sabayon, Arch, Mandriva, PCLinuxOS, Mepis, or even Slackware?

I can think of a couple of answers to that question, but they're nowhere near enough to say "No other distro, except Fedora, can come close." And most of them are extremely subjective, and so may not apply to any given user. And I can name an almost equal number of subjective reasons to prefer Debian, Arch, or Slackware. So if there actually are objective reasons to prefer Ubuntu, I'd like to hear them.

If the reasons are purely subjective, that's OK too, but the writer needs to make that clear.

I think It's probably sufficient to point out that I could rephrase 80% of the writer's comment, but replace Ubuntu with Debian. :)
albinard

Mar 23, 2011
10:50 AM EST
Confession: I'm new enough to Linux that I use Ubuntu more than some of the others because I'm more used to it. It will take me a while to get as used to RPM distros as I am to APT, but my preferences are more due to learning curve than anything else. You should have seen my Separation Anxiety when I dumped Windows!
jdixon

Mar 23, 2011
10:56 AM EST
> I use Ubuntu more than some of the others because I'm more used to it.

Which is a perfectly good and valid reason, and pretty much the same reason I still use Slackware.

There's nothing wrong with subjective reasons for preferring one distro to another, as long as you realize that they are, in fact, subjective.
gus3

Mar 23, 2011
11:08 AM EST
Preferences to use, are subjective. It does not follow automatically that preferences to avoid are likewise subjective. It is possible to make something that is, objectively, cr@p.
jdixon

Mar 23, 2011
11:21 AM EST
> It is possible to make something that is, objectively, cr@p.

Let's leave Windows out of this. :)
Bob_Robertson

Mar 23, 2011
11:24 AM EST
I will say that the blog entries that I made that specifically had "ubuntu" in the title were the most "hit", but also the shortest lived.

The SSH post is still getting a few hits, seems like there's a more long-term demand for fundamental utilities than there is for today's latest and greatest flash-bang.
tuxchick

Mar 23, 2011
11:41 AM EST
Ubuntu Linus brain-dead lady gaga bieber naked.
Steven_Rosenber

Mar 23, 2011
12:09 PM EST
Once you do this for awhile, you realize that the distros have more in common than not. When you throw away branding and configuration choices, you have the Linux kernel, the GNU userland, your choice of desktop environments / window managers, and then the applications you use.

Sure, there are differences, but the underlying plumbing is what it is.
Bob_Robertson

Mar 23, 2011
12:31 PM EST
> you have the Linux kernel, the GNU userland, your choice of desktop environments / window managers, and then the applications you use.

Oh. Debian.
azerthoth

Mar 23, 2011
12:35 PM EST
arrg, now I have to bleach my eyes TC.
ComputerBob

Mar 23, 2011
1:01 PM EST
Quoting:Copy cats are flattering. and appeal to the less ambitious converts to the Linux world. As for me, the basic Ubuntu is all I need.


Ubuntu is a little person, standing on Debian's shoulders.
herzeleid

Mar 23, 2011
1:32 PM EST
Computerbob said:
Quoting: Ubuntu is a little person, standing on Debian's shoulders


By all means, let's give credit where credit is due. Yes, Shuttleworth is a debian developer, and chose debian as the base for his "linux for human beings" project. Shuttleworth added a lot of value. Sure, it's easy to complain that it's not fair, that he leveraged all of debian's hard work, but isn't the ability to take code and enhance it and contribute it back what GNU is all about?

Seriously, take a look at the number of ubuntu destkop users vs the number of debian desktop users, and you have to admit ubuntu is filling a demand. You can insult those who are creating that demand, you can complain that they should just man up and use debian, but it is what it is.

jdixon

Mar 23, 2011
2:09 PM EST
> ...and you have to admit ubuntu is filling a demand.

No one's said it hasn't. My question was the basis for the comment "No other distro, except Fedora, can come close." When I hear a comment like that, I like to hear some reasons, not just a blanket assertion.

A good example of some what I would have liked to hear was SJVN's review of OpenSuSE. He gave two examples of areas where he felt it needed improvement: fonts and software installation. Both of those are rather (but not completely) subjective, but they valid reasons for preferring one distro over another.
Bob_Robertson

Mar 23, 2011
2:12 PM EST
> Both of those are rather...subjective, but they valid reasons for preferring one distro over another.

It is my personal opinion that "subjective" is the only valid reason to prefer one distribution over another.

I can tell someone all day long how they would be "objectively" better served by using X rather than Y, but if they simply prefer Y for whatever reason, that's their decision.

In some circles, that would be objected to as "prejudice" and even "racism". And truly, personal preferences don't bother me in the slightest regardless of subject.
jdixon

Mar 23, 2011
2:29 PM EST
> It is my personal opinion that "subjective" is the only valid reason to prefer one distribution over another.

I can think of some "objective" reasons. The number of programs in a distro's repository. Whether or not the distro supports compiling programs which aren't in its repository. Speed on the hardware in question. Whether existing hardware works or not. These may or may not be relevant to any given person, but they can be determined independently of a user's preferences.

However, I largely agree with you.
Steven_Rosenber

Mar 23, 2011
3:09 PM EST
Ubuntu has a definite place in the Linux ecosphere. Whether you like the way Canonical and its SABDFL run things is another matter. But whatever Ubuntu does will eventually be available upstream for any distros that want to use it. It looks like Shuttleworth is still pushing GNOME to bring Unity into the project as an alternative to GNOME Shell. We'll see how that goes.

But however many eggs Ubuntu breaks, they want to move quickly. That kind of commitment to change can't help but push the rest of the community to do better in their own projects.
ComputerBob

Mar 23, 2011
4:14 PM EST
Quoting:By all means, let's give credit where credit is due. Yes, Shuttleworth is a debian developer, and chose debian as the base for his "linux for human beings" project. Shuttleworth added a lot of value. Sure, it's easy to complain that it's not fair, that he leveraged all of debian's hard work, but isn't the ability to take code and enhance it and contribute it back what GNU is all about?

Seriously, take a look at the number of ubuntu destkop users vs the number of debian desktop users, and you have to admit ubuntu is filling a demand. You can insult those who are creating that demand, you can complain that they should just man up and use debian, but it is what it is.
Those are all valid points that you apparently aimed at me -- apparently without realizing that I hadn't committed any of the sins to which you refer.

All I did was point out that the OP completely ignored the fact that many people see Ubuntu itself as "a copy cat" that wouldn't even exist were it not for Debian.
gus3

Mar 23, 2011
4:18 PM EST
Quoting:many people see Ubuntu itself as "a copy cat" that wouldn't even exist were it not for Debian.
And many people would be mistaken to hold to such a hypothetical. Without Debian, Ubuntu would base off another distro, or maybe off of a BSD. Ubuntu being a Debian derivative is simply how history played out.
tuxchick

Mar 23, 2011
4:19 PM EST
Just doing my bit to boost LXer's SEO, az!
tracyanne

Mar 23, 2011
6:27 PM EST
Quoting:Just doing my bit to boost LXer's SEO, az!


You need to make all those words into links, then it will boost SEO, with out that they are just hot air, hot ink... um hot electrons... words
Steven_Rosenber

Mar 23, 2011
6:50 PM EST
If we started a campaign to get Justin Bieber and Lady Gaga to use Linux and could mention their names all the time -- and then got to work on Charlie Sheen, Lindsay Lohan and Britney Spears, then we'd be getting somewhere ... after that the Kardashian sisters would be easy.
gus3

Mar 23, 2011
7:02 PM EST
Click at your own risk
ComputerBob

Mar 23, 2011
7:57 PM EST
Quoting:And many people would be mistaken to hold to such a hypothetical. Without Debian, Ubuntu would base off another distro, or maybe off of a BSD...


It looks to me like your statement is the one that's purely hypothetical.
hkwint

Mar 24, 2011
3:13 AM EST
"After Justin Bieber sent a mail to thank Linus for all the free software which he downloaded, and after watching the AlJazeera livestream to inform him about the war in Libya and the nuclear reactors in Japan, he fired up his new Ubuntu tablet to install Firefox 4 (of which he read great reviews comparing fishtank numbers to IE9), and he noted - again - Lady Gaga was more popular on Twitter than he was after the naked pictures she posted to youtube but were banned by Google, and he thought: "Which brain dead person would be such an attention whore, US senate should pass a new bill to forbid people from being more popular than I am, and Charlie Sheen should be three-strikes banned from the internet altogether!"

Ah, sorry TC, but Google recently updated algotithms to include natural speach analysis to catch link farms. So we have to make sure those terms make sense and don't look like a link farm. Let's see if this works?

Greetings,

the brand new LXer 'natural language' SEO-bot
JaseP

Mar 24, 2011
7:43 AM EST
I am an admitted Ubuntu user. I have used other distros in the past, but usually come back,... because it's easy. It's like Debian, but with the rough edges knocked off. There's something nice about an apt-get enabled distro that gets a lot of developer attention that just appeals to me.

But, I am not a fanboi. I'll be the first to admit that Ubuntu gets "oversold," especially to new users. And there are things about the design choices and package decisions that I don't like.

I would really love to switch to a compiled distro, but I just don't have the time. I think that if you could marry the best things about Fedora & Ubuntu with a compiled distro, it would take off. That is especially true of the embeded market. A distro that is compiled for the host system that is also user-friendly would allow mobile devices, for example, to share the same interface & environment as it's desktop counterpart.
herzeleid

Mar 24, 2011
10:49 AM EST
Quoting:I think that if you could marry the best things about Fedora & Ubuntu with a compiled distro, it would take off.
So you're going to try out fuduntu?
flufferbeer

Mar 24, 2011
12:30 PM EST
I think that there are NOT YET NEARLY enough Ubuntu posts or Ubuntu-based distros ::sarcastic::

Was it the Rolling Stones who said "Too Much is Never Enough" in regards to Ubuntu??....er, that would be in regards to Sex, Drugs and Rock n' Roll

2c
JaseP

Mar 25, 2011
9:01 AM EST
Quoting: So you're going to try out fuduntu?


OK, let me RE-clarify,... I meant kinda like a cross between Ubuntu, Fedora & Arch (but way easier than Arch). That's what I meant by compiled,... not "pre-compiled."

But fuduntu looks interesting. The default is very similar to what I have set up. But that doesn't look like Cairo-dock as the menu/dock...

You cannot post until you login.