Hibernate on Ubuntu and derivatives

Forum: LinuxTotal Replies: 33
Author Content
tracyanne

Jul 13, 2012
6:19 PM EST
The problem with Hibernate on Ubuntu and Derivatives is NOT flaky BIOS. Canonical have broken it.

Hibernate used to work perfectly on my laptop. The only thing that has changed is the operating system, an upgrade from Linux Mint 12 to LM 13 (and therefore Ubuntu 12.04).

I can't even get it to Hibernate using the CLI sudo pm-hibernate. It just shuts down.
JaseP

Jul 13, 2012
8:48 PM EST
You can only say that it's Canonical's fault if another distro, with the same kernel version, doesn't experience the same problem. What about Debian?
tracyanne

Jul 13, 2012
9:03 PM EST
Haven't tried another, only been trying to get hibernate to work this morning, I kinda miss it
JaseP

Jul 13, 2012
9:07 PM EST
Meh,... Hibernate's OK. But suspend is better.
tracyanne

Jul 13, 2012
9:20 PM EST
Suspend is fine for every day use, but hibernate is much better when I'm travelling, and the computer has to be physically secured while our motor home is in motion, especially on our roads.
tracyanne

Jul 14, 2012
5:10 PM EST
I have hibernate again. I gave up and installed the Hibernate application from the repository. It's not the same as the ASPCI hibernate but it gets the job done.
HoTMetaL

Jul 15, 2012
1:14 AM EST
Does it really save you that much time vs. booting from power off, tracyanne? I've always found hibernate useless and buggy, and Ubuntu was right to hide it's menu option. Every Linux distro I've ever booted has done so in ~30 seconds or less even on weak hardware.
tracyanne

Jul 15, 2012
2:00 AM EST
HoTMetal, absolutely. I usually have Evolution plus 2 oe 3 instances of Firefox, with usually 3 Windows and 15 to 30 tabs on one of those instances, plus numerous other applications from MonoDevelop to GIMP to Audacity and Ardour.

Waiting for even one of those applications to load and reload the session I was in takes way longer than restarting from cold and restoring from hibernate. Of course suspend is a lot faster, but I really do need hibernate more often than most people.
helios

Jul 15, 2012
10:45 AM EST
Plus, one builds up much more heat than the other but since I now use neither, I can't remember which is which. H3!!, I can't remember what I had for breakfast.
gus3

Jul 15, 2012
4:23 PM EST
@TA, are you running all those at once?

That may sound like a dumb question, but I have to wonder how much swap thrashing your system is doing.
tracyanne

Jul 15, 2012
5:48 PM EST
Quoting:... running all those at once?


depends. But often many of them at once.

Quoting:... I have to wonder how much swap thrashing.....


Last I looked zero.

8 Gig of RAM and swapiness set to 30
caitlyn

Jul 18, 2012
2:36 PM EST
Without having tracyanne's hardware and the ability to test various distros on it I can't tell if this is an Ubuntu-specific problem or not. I can say that 12.04 has a regression on my hardware regarding wireless and that the printing problem with a class of print drivers I wrote about three years ago still isn't fixed. Oh, and yes, those drivers and those printers work just fine in other distros.
Bob_Robertson

Jul 18, 2012
2:54 PM EST
Ok, I know this seems a stupid question, but the words "hibernate" and "suspend" have been reversed a few times for me and I've lost track.

Which one is the "writes what is in RAM to disk and powers off"?
jdixon

Jul 18, 2012
3:24 PM EST
> but the words "hibernate" and "suspend" have been reversed a few times for me...

Not just for you. :)

> Which one is the "writes what is in RAM to disk and powers off"?

I believe that would be hibernate. I believe suspend leaves the machine in a limited power mode.
Fettoosh

Jul 18, 2012
3:37 PM EST
Hibernate

flufferbeer

Jul 18, 2012
5:09 PM EST
Yeah, hibernate FROM the onslaught of Baboontus!
caitlyn

Jul 18, 2012
7:42 PM EST
Quoting:I believe that would be hibernate. I believe suspend leaves the machine in a limited power mode.
That's how I understand it too.
Bob_Robertson

Jul 19, 2012
7:49 AM EST
Many thanks.
caitlyn

Sep 21, 2012
7:36 PM EST
What's with all these two month old stories popping up on the comment queue?
cr

Sep 22, 2012
2:21 AM EST
My guess is that the updated timestamps are the residue of comment-spam arrival-and-departure. The spammers seem to feel fond of comment necromancy around here. In which case, thank you, Scott, for being ready with the electric white-out.
Steven_Rosenber

Sep 22, 2012
2:04 PM EST
I've found that suspend will bite you if you don't leave the laptop plugged into a power source and your battery is less than stellar.
tracyanne

Sep 22, 2012
4:46 PM EST
@ Steven_Rosenber, I find that Unity has a panic and crashes, and you drop to the terminal, then the system hard locks
olefowdie

Apr 18, 2013
8:22 AM EST
su -c "echo 'disk' > /sys/power/state"
Collin_O

Apr 18, 2013
8:54 PM EST
I recently did up a machine for a friend who didn't want linux of any kind he wanted Windows 7 (a Dell Optiplex 390) and he was adamant that it sleep - the thing would sleep alright, but refused to wake up no matter how hard I kicked it, lol. After fussing with it for about a week (read: until sanity was severely compromised), I lobotomized the machine, put Ubuntu 12.04 64 bit on it and then suspend AND hibernate BOTH worked like a charm, and without fail for 9 months now. W7 runs as a VM on it but he loves Ubuntu so much he almost never uses the W7 VM, lol. I have never had issues with Ubuntu not suspending or hibernating on any of my Dell machines - well, it was a bit twitchy on my Dell Precision laptop, but I got it squared aware in under an hour.
Bob_Robertson

Apr 19, 2013
8:36 AM EST
Hibernate/Sleep is one of those things where pre-installation really does help. The OEM sets up their own drivers, their own hardware, to work on this specific OS.

I've written it before, and I'm sure I'll write it again, the Linux kernel developers who have had to reverse engineer hardware drivers have done spectacular things in what seems to be the labors of Sisyphus.
JaseP

Apr 19, 2013
8:51 AM EST
The problem with all ACPI stuff is that it's proprietary BS,... There aren't true open standards. Power savings are often accomplished by trickery shell games, smoke, mirrors, and settings that users have no control over... Much of the time it has to do with shutting devices off on boot (which makes identifying them near impossible). And turning them on ends up being some sort of "trade secret" that OEMs won't disclose (for fear of violating an agreement with an 800 lb gorilla from Washington state).

Wanna squeak 6-8 hrs out of that Atom chipset? You'll have to deactivate Bluetooth & WiFi when they go idle,... and God forbid having an active GPS chip. Plus, the machine will idle the cores down to next to nothing,... but only if you have the right "magic sauce" to get the thing to do it... This is why I've largely given up on x86 tablets and mobile devices.
linuxwriter

Apr 23, 2013
12:38 AM EST
Hibernate is probably broken by design to satisfy the demands of secure boot. When a Linux system returns from hibernation, the image is not verified; this is a requirement for running a system on a secure boot-enabled PC or laptop.
Steven_Rosenber

Apr 23, 2013
12:41 AM EST
My Windows 8 machine doesn't offer Hibernate, only Suspend.
linuxwriter

Apr 23, 2013
5:51 PM EST
@Steven_Rosenber It's not enabled by default. You can enable it: http://www.pcworld.com/article/2016932/how-to-enable-hiberna...

Sam
uigubrosti

Apr 30, 2013
2:44 AM EST
On my Laptop witch windows 8 dont have Hibernate too like mr Steven. For real i dont like win8, win7 i much better for me. Have Ubuntu on my PC hibernation dosnt't work fo me too, after read this topic maybe i will try to fix this, but hibernation is not nesesery.

Bob_Robertson

Apr 30, 2013
7:48 AM EST
I did a test in power up time between hibernate and power-off, under Linux.

It turned out to be faster to boot the machine than to restore from hibernate. And with "save session" and the restoration of the same tabs that were open when the browser was closed, I got the same functionality of hibernate except that I have to save before shutting down.

I do use hibernate on Win7 for work, but that's because Windows is such a pig.
DrGeoffrey

Apr 30, 2013
11:14 AM EST
With regard to speed of shutdown/restart vs hibernate/resume on the three laptops and one desktop I oversee,

Desktop: Older Lenovo product (purchased from Circuit City!), shutdown beats hibernate easily (like laptop 3, mostly a gaming platform)

Laptop 1: Asus (~3 years old). Hibernate beats shutdown, easily.

Laptop 2: Zareason (~6 months old). Slight edge to hibernate/restore.

Laptop 3: Acer (~1 year old). Used by son as a gaming platform. Reports shutdown/restart much faster and more reliable.

Methinks the outcome is very dependent upon distribution, applications, hardware, and user interest.
Fettoosh

Apr 30, 2013
4:29 PM EST
Hibernate could be slower than power up/restart because hibernate brings everything that was actively running back to life (restore) from disk while power up/restart doesn't.

Suspend I believe is always faster than either power up/restart or hibernate since many of the active applications are still in memory and some hardware still active compared to hibernate/restart of apps.

I don't think age has anything to do with that.

helios

May 05, 2013
8:27 PM EST
"I don't think age has anything to do with that."

Try getting up in the morning with these knees.

Oh, you mean computer age.

Never mind.

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