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Pico-ITX hacker board runs Linux on Allwinner A20

Anichips announced a $59 SBC said to be the first Pico-ITX board based on Allwinner’s dual-core, Cortex-A7 based A20 SoC. The 100 x 72mm, open source, Android- and Linux-ready PhoenixA20 offers multiple display and wireless interfaces, as well as camera and Ethernet ports, and is supported by the same SwiftBoard.org community that backs the company’s […]

The Gambas Project: It's Like Visual Basic On Linux

  • Phoronix (Posted by bob on Nov 25, 2013 7:14 PM EDT)
  • Groups: Linux; Story Type: News Story
Gambas is an open-source development environment based on a Basic interpreter and with support for object extensions. It's been compared to Visual Basic, but Gambas supports Linux and is GPLv2 software...

Advanced Hard Drive Caching Techniques

With the introduction of the solid-state Flash drive, performance came to the forefront for data storage technologies. Prior to that, software developers and server administrators needed to devise methods for which they could increase I/O throughput to storage, most of which resulted in low capacity caching to random access memory (RAM) or a RAM drive.

Little devil: Electric Imp is an Internet of Things Wi-Fi PC-ON-AN-SD-CARD

  • The Register (Posted by bob on Nov 25, 2013 1:35 PM EDT)
  • Story Type: News Story
The card micro that makes connecting projects to the cloud easy Review Most products’ origins are prosaic: an inventor or a suit spots a gap in the market and attempts to fill it. Other products, however, have rather more bizarre beginnings. A case in point: Electric Imp came about because co-founder Hugo Fiennes wanted to connect the lights in his new bathroom to the internet.…

We all need to take it offline now and then

We're at a particularly interesting time in technology, the Internet, the open source movements, and what accessibility means. We get the ability to be a lot of different people that were not possible before: web designer, cloud architect, open source project manager, open source developer, and more. Working from home is viable with an Internet connection in a way that wasn’t available in the early 1990s. And, when was the last time you looked at the Yellow Pages? (I was on vacation in the Bahamas and was curious. That was it for me.)

Revealed: The amazing BlackBerry wizardry that created its 'better Android than Android'

The ingenious hack that throws the company a lifeline Exclusive Some remarkable technical wizardry lies behind BlackBerry’s Android coup. When it was launched in January, BlackBerry’s new OS was brand new BlackBerry 10 and largely app-less. But today it can execute Android apps at impressive speed. How did they do it? Thanks to some helpful inside knowledge, The Register will reveal it all.…

The European Commission's Neelie Kroes believes in open

  • opensource.com (Posted by bob on Nov 25, 2013 8:49 AM EDT)
  • Story Type: News Story
Neelie Kroes, VP of the European Commission (EC), has a website called Comment Neelie to initiate and maintain a two-way conversation between herself, as a politician, and the public, as citizens. Kroes says that it's "a channel to communicate, not just broadcast."

Mesa 10.0 Release Candidate 2 Has Arrived

  • Phoronix (Posted by bob on Nov 24, 2013 1:57 PM EDT)
  • Story Type: News Story
The second release candidate of Mesa 10.0 has arrived. There's hope that the final version will be released next week...

Intel wakes up and smells the post-PC era

At its investor meeting yesterday, Intel exhibited its readiness to face the new realities of the “post-PC era.” Led by CEO Brian Krzanich, top executives outlined strategic efforts to speed its mobile Atom system-on-chips toward 14 and 10nm geometries, 64-bits, and integrated basebands, and to look beyond Windows on the client end, with increased focus […]

OpenMandriva Lx 2013.0 Released

OpenMandriva has put out their Lx 2013.0 release for those still hoping to relive the glorious Mandrake and Mandriva days...

Linux-fueled networked DVR adds second tuner

Really Simple Software has begun accepting pre-orders for the second generation of its Linux-powered networked DVR. The new model, known as “Simple.TV by SiliconDust” and priced at $250, adds a second TV tuner and is expected to ship by the end of the year, by which time Android and iOS apps for both generations of […]

How to write a book in five days

  • opensource.com (Posted by bob on Nov 21, 2013 12:54 PM EDT)
  • Story Type: News Story
If you shut people in a room for a week with seven other people with the same interests, they have a ball and write a book. —Adam Hyde, founder of FLOSS Manuals That’s what happened at the 2013 edition of the Google Summer of Code (GSoC) Doc Camp. A group of 20 open source enthusiasts gathered together in the middle of October and wrote not just one but three books in the span of five days. I was fortunate enough to attend the event. Here’s a peek at what went down over those five days.

How a hackathon can transform your community

What started as an uphill battle in Burlington, Vermont on the National Day of Civic Hacking in June 2013, transversed into an understanding between local government, non-profits, the media, and the community four months later. What they came to understand was that we can grow stronger when we work together. When we partner. When we work on stuff that matters. Robert Coleburn, a Technology Librarian (and systems administrator) at Fletcher Free Library, jumped at the opportunity to partner with Code for Burlington, a Code for America brigade, to help host a hackathon on the last weekend in October called Hack the Stacks. The event drew over 30 people volunteering to improve their community through open source technology.

Google gives Glasshole devs a peek at new native software kit

Run apps directly on the Glass hardware Google has unveiled what it's calling a "sneak peek" at its Glass Developer Kit (GDK), a new way to write software for the Chocolate Factory's privacy-stomping future-specs.…

Your opinion counts! Take the FLOSS 2013 survey

In 2002, the GSyC/LibreSoft research group at the Universidad Rey Juan Carlos successfully surveyed a broad swath of over 2500 respondents (mostly developers) from open source and free software communities. They have long been researching and collaborating with Free and Libre Open Sourse Software (FLOSS or FOSS) organizations and groups and are back again to recreate the survey with the goal of assessing where the community stands today after over ten years of evolution and innovation. This year, the Libresoft research group encourages anyone involved in a FLOSS project (not only developers) to participate in the survey.

Experts applaud Google completion of SSL certificate upgrade

  • CSO Security; By Antone Gonsalves (Posted by bob on Nov 20, 2013 3:42 PM EDT)
  • Story Type: News Story, Security
Google's faster-than-expected upgrade of all its SSL certificates to an RSA key length of 2048 bits will make cracking connections to the company's services more difficult without affecting performance, experts say.

How to attract more women to tech conferences

  • opensource.com (Posted by bob on Nov 20, 2013 2:45 PM EDT)
  • Story Type: News Story
One of the best emails to get before a conference you're psyched to attend is the one that outlines all the final details. It links to the final speakers' schedule, reminds you of important things like where to park and when to check-in, and of course, that email tells you about the fun parties. That email revs you up and organizes you for the conference to come. So when I opened up the "final details" email for the recent All Things Open conference in Raleigh, I was expecting to see an outline of the typical who, what, when, where info. I wasn’t expecting the first item to be a reminder of the conference's anti/no harassment policy. But there it was—the first item on the list:

How civic hackers can build apps that last

  • opensource.com (Posted by bob on Nov 20, 2013 1:51 PM EDT)
  • Story Type: News Story
This is a condensed version of the blog post: Hey Civic Hackers! How about leaving the ninja skills at home and building really useful applications? It includes more analogies and cars. Comments welcome. Most hackers are deeply involved in the tech scene. They keep up to date with the latest technologies and will use tech that is in the early phases of adoption. They have no problem using cloud services, NoSQL data stores, languages with smaller communities, and target more recent browsers or phones. They don't mind doing custom configurations on server software, they probably already know some of the maintainers of the project and can get special help, and they know other hackers who they can reach out to. They generally come from a startup world or at least from software companies where budgets and skill sets are generally high for employees.

HUD-enabled ski goggles run Android

Recon Instruments announced an Android-based $399 heads-up display (HUD) designed to fit inside ski goggles. The Snow2 is equipped with a 1GHz, dual-core processor, a 428 x 240 mini-display, plus WiFi, Bluetooth, GPS, and sensors, and it syncs to Android and iOS devices. The Snow2 updates a previous MOD Live HUD wearable that was similarly […]

Tiny hackable $40 SBC runs Linux on Allwinner A10

Olimex’s OLinuXino project announced a tiny, Android- and Linux-ready single board computer based on Allwinner’s 1GHz, Cortex-A8 based A10 processor, and the first one to be offered with a mini-PC enclosure. The open source A10-OLinuXino-Lime offers 512MB of DDR3 RAM, an optional 4GB of NAND flash, plus HDMI, SATA, USB, and Ethernet, starting at only […]

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