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A Mile in Someone Else's Shoes

Brian Proffitt, Managing Editor at Linux Today writes: "The first thing that set me off this week was the Microsoft comment about free software in Africa. You may have heard them, where Gerald Ilukwe, the general manager of Microsoft Nigeria, claimed that cost of software is not an important issue in the developing world. Gee, according to the message Microsoft is shoving down our throats here in the US, cost is the most important thing." He then writes further:

"Would someone explain to me how in a society where money is relatively plentiful, cost is the most important thing, and just the opposite is true where the average person makes US$160?"

Brian later explains how he reacted to other events which eventually allowed him to gain insight or stand in anothers shoes. This is a story worth a look - Ed.

Where Linux 802.11x support needs work

  • Linux Kernel Archive; By Dan Williams (Posted by tadelste on Oct 22, 2005 4:46 PM EDT)
  • Groups: Kernel; Story Type: News Story
This list of stuff that should get fixed in Linux wireless grew out of my attempt to put a GUI on top of Linux wireless with NetworkManager (http://people.redhat.com/dcbw/NetworkManager). This isn't, of course, a demand or anything, and I've been personally slowly fixing stuff up as I come to it (orinoco merge, fixing linux-wlan-ng, small kernel wireless driver patches), but I don't think anyone has posted a comprehensive list of where Linux wireless currently falls a bit short.

Opera browser in Hindi, Punjabi

Kochi: Opera Software, the Norway-based company behind the Opera Internet browser, has introduced Hindi and Punjabi versions of its browser, aimed at reaching out to non-English speaking Net users.

IBM bemoans Joomla-Mambo split

It's unfortunate for the Mambo open-source publishing software project and for its customers that its developers had to decamp with their source code to start the Joomla project, according to a high-ranking IBM software executive.

"It does look like the company that was shepherding this along got a little bit off track on their interests vs. the open-source community's interests," said Rod Smith, vice president of emerging Internet technology for IBM's Software Group, in an interview Tuesday. "That's a bad thing," because Mambo had a lot of traction, and the "fork" undermines that, he said.

Terminal Tips: Centericq open source chat aggregator on OS X

  • tuaw.com; By Fabienne Serriere (Posted by tadelste on Oct 22, 2005 3:49 PM EDT)
  • Story Type: News Story
In my everlasting quest for the best multi chat protocol client, I decided to check out Centericq. The Centericq chat client, despite its name also supports aim (and .mac accounts), yahoo, jabber (and therefore peripherally talk.google), irc, gadu gadu (the polish chat protocol), and msn. The client is purely terminal based. After trying Centericq for a few days, I must conclude that there are a few things left to be desired. I didn't enjoy the annoying key combos to bring up menus (Esc-Esc [wait then] b for the basic menu) or the mislabeled menu keys that obviously are already assigned in OS X (F9, F2 etc). To change between chat conversations, the key combos actually work on OS X (Ctrl-B or Ctrl-N to scroll forward or backwards).

X-Micro TV-BAR - The mini DVB-T USB Box

X-Micro TV-BAR DVB-T is the latest external & mini-sized DVB-T USB TV solution presented by X-Micro Technology. Not like other PCMCIA solution, X-Micro TV-BAR DVB-T adopts USB2.0 interface to provide users the flexibility of watching TV on PC or laptop. In addition, X-Micro TV-BAR DVB-T performs impressively in different aspects: Hardware design, Driver supported Software Features and friendly user interface.

School Traps Infected PCs

  • PCWorld.com; By John Cox, Network World (Posted by tadelste on Oct 22, 2005 3:06 PM EDT)
  • Story Type: News Story
ORLANDO -- A team of IT staffers at the University of Indianapolis recently showed off a bundle of open-source tools and scripts it uses to trap and isolate PCs infected by viruses or spyware.

Dubbed Shelob, after the sinister giant spider in J.R.R. Tolkien's "Lord of the Rings," the software identifies suspect traffic patterns, identifies the computers involved and then shunts them to a closed virtual LAN. Users get an appropriate Web screen, explaining what's happened and how to fix their PC or whom to call for help.

Open Source Orgs Invited To Fourth Annual Socal Linux Expo

  • Linux Electronics (Posted by tadelste on Oct 22, 2005 2:52 PM EDT)
SCALE is inviting all Open Source organizations to participate in the fourth annual So Cal Linux Expo.

Looking for an effective way to tell your product story and demonstrate its latest features to both new users as well as Linux veterans? Join other prestigious members of the Open Source community as they combine forces at the preeminent Linux exposition in the West. The fourth annual Southern California Linux Expo brings together businesses, academic institutions and the Linux community in Los Angeles on February 11-12, 2006.

If you rebuild it, it will sell

  • The Herald News On-line; By Catherine Ann Velasco (Posted by tadelste on Oct 22, 2005 2:37 PM EDT)
  • Story Type: News Story
The computer club spent many weeks learning how to hook up hard drives and DVD-burners, and they studied the Linux Operating System that they installed so they could teach their buyers how to use the software on their custom-built computers.

Apache Rolls Out a New Maven

  • Internetnews.com; By Sean Michael Kerner (Posted by tadelste on Oct 22, 2005 2:09 PM EDT)
  • Story Type: News Story
The word "Maven" is a Yiddish colloquialism that is defined as a self-appointed expert who shares knowledge with others. It's also a very appropriate name for a software project management tool, developed through the auspices of the venerable open source Apache Software Foundation (ASF).

Overview: Initial Results of a Large-Scale Migration Project

  • GrokLaw; By Pamela Jones (Posted by tadelste on Oct 22, 2005 1:55 PM EDT)
  • Groups: GNU; Story Type: News Story
Pamela writes: "Carlo Daffara sent me a fascinating email about the European COSPA project, that is doing a controlled study of migrations to Free and Open Source software by European governmental administrations. They are measuring and facilitating migrations in a two-step strategy, initially to OpenOffice.org and later to GNU/Linux on the desktops. They already have thousands of desktops migrated, with thousands more planned. The data on switching to OpenOffice.org is very encouraging. "

What have they found so far? What makes the transition work well? Are there steps one can take to improve user acceptance and ease transitional issues? He told me some of what they found, and I asked him if he'd be willing to elaborate on the findings for Groklaw, and he graciously agreed.

German Edition of Xandros Desktop OS in Final Testing Stage

Xandros has said that the German Edition of its Windows desktop alternative is undergoing final beta testing prior to general release in November at the Frankfurt LinuxWorld conference and expo. The new release comes in response to growing demand in the German speaking market for desktop products based on Debian Linux, and marks a major expansion in Xandros' European sales and support.

Peru's president approves open-source bill

Alejandro Toledo, president of Peru, signed legislation this week that allows public institutions to consider adopting open-source software, another step forward for the open-software movement. The legislation, which Peru's Congress approved in September, allows government agencies and schools to choose between proprietary software from companies like Microsoft or Oracle, as well as open-source alternatives.

Review: Ubuntu 5.10 "Breezy Badger"

In the short time that I've spent using Ubuntu 5.10 (Breezy Badger), I've really come to like it. The installation was painless, all my hardware was detected and configured correctly, package management was easy, and the clean-cut GNOME desktop is terrific.

Why Is Microsoft Afraid of Google?

“It's not clear how much Microsoft actually believes that the web is the platform of the future. After conquering its immediate adversary, the company tends to retrench and fall back on developing its core assets. That may work again this time. But, eventually, it may not be enough to forestall the Internet tidal wave that will eventually arrive.”

Maria Winslow's LinuxWorld Blog: Big Step Forward for Open Source ...

  • SYS-CON Media; By Maria Winslow (Posted by tadelste on Oct 22, 2005 10:39 AM EDT)
  • Story Type: News Story
The National Center for Open Source Policy and Research (NCOSPR) was recently announced, and represents a big step forward in open source advocacy in government. The non-profit's mission is to "recruit experienced and innovative thinkers to help craft development, implementation and acquisition policies that will facilitate the continual adoption and growth of open source within the public sector IT communities."

Sony awards prizes to university programming students

  • GamesIndustry.biz; By Paul Loughrey (Posted by tadelste on Oct 22, 2005 9:52 AM EDT)
  • Story Type: News Story
The university began teaching console game programming in 1998, focusing on the PlayStation console. The course was redesigned in 2002 to concentrate on the PS2 console, using PlayStation2-Linux development kits donated by Sony.

Linuxworld: The Future's So Bright For Open Source

  • Web Services Journal; By Mark R. Hinkle (Posted by tadelste on Oct 22, 2005 9:28 AM EDT)
  • Story Type: News Story
I recently broke my glasses though I admit I don't wear them much and I started to notice that I was squinting more. Sometimes I could make out what was going on on my Linux desktop, which is set to a whopping 1920 x 1200 resolution, but I couldn't quite make out some items without closer inspection.

That's like the way I think businesses and government agencies have come to view Linux and Open Source. They've been squinting at the "Open Source movement" knowing that there's something worth looking at there but not quite making out the details. I think those days are ending since the drought in IT spending has left the wary IT buyer looking for more efficient and cost-effective solutions that give them big returns on their IT dollars - or at least don't waste them on what, in hindsight, turns out to be frivolous solutions that don't return what was promised.

Major layoffs expected at Novell

Server software company could cut 1,000 or more jobs in attempt to restore its financial strength.

CMP Media's VARBusiness Magazine Honors Tech Innovator Awards Winners

  • PR Newswire; By Press release (Posted by tadelste on Oct 22, 2005 8:41 AM EDT)
  • Story Type: Press Release
IBM Named Tech Innovator of the Year

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