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Sue Me First, Microsoft!

Tired of Microsoft rattling the patent sabers against FOSS? Why not join Christian Einfeldt at the Digital Tipping Point and demand that Microsoft sue you first! Or to put it another way, "Hey, Microsoft, put up or shut up!"

Sun's Schwartz Pledges to Use Patents to Protect Red Hat and Ubuntu

You have to take a look at Sun CEO Jonathan Schwartz's blog today. He has pledged the company will use its patents to defend Red Hat and Ubuntu. That's the headline, and I'm really happy to know that Sun's very extensive patent portfolio is available, just in case it is ever needed. You never know these days. And yes, I take that as a message in a bottle to Microsoft. But he says it in such an interesting and creative way, I think you'll be glad if you go and read the entire entry.

Penguins rejoice: Linux gets TV

The wait is over, Linux users out there can now watch Live TV on their platform of choice.

First OpenOffice virus emerges

Pop the champagne corks, Microsoft. The first OpenOffice virus has emerged, displaying an indecent pic of a guy in a bunny suit fornicating with a girl in the woods.

Puppy Linux targets sub-$100 mini-PCs

Following the addition of PXE network booting to the ultra-lightweight Puppy Linux distribution, a group of enthusiasts offering Puppy customization and support services has revealed plans for "Minipup," a project aimed at ultra-low-cost diskless hardware such as sub-$100 PCs.

Microsoft vs. Open Source: Military Moves

We're now seeing Microsoft's true stripes. The performance of the products is a charade, an unfortunate cost of doing business in a once competitive market. The real means to profits and market share are really about legal positioning, but in essence necessitates a military posture. For what are laws and lawyers but a means to avoid violence and warfare in lieu of a day in court?

San Diego schools pick SUSE Linux desktop

The San Diego Unified School District has selected Novell's SLED 10 (SUSE Linux Enterprise Desktop) as the standard platform for its "Always-On Learning Initiative," a mobile computing initiative intended to help students achieve academic success and prepare them for life and work in the 21st century.

NVIDIA 100.14.06 Display Driver

  • Phoronix; By Michael Larabel (Posted by phoronix on May 22, 2007 1:17 AM EDT)
  • Story Type: News Story
It was exactly one month ago that NVIDIA had delivered the 100.14.03 display driver and today we are reporting on yet another new beta driver in the 100.14.xx series. This time around we have our hands on the NVIDIA 100.14.06 graphics driver, which offers improved notebook support and fixes a variety of minor bugs.

Fedora Weekly News Issue 88

Welcome to Fedora Weekly News Issue 88 for the week of May 13th through May 19th, 2007.

Dell Ubuntu desktop details emerge

On the record, a Dell spokesman said he "can't comment on unannounced products," when asked about Dell's forthcoming Ubuntu-powered PCs. Over on Direct2Dell, meanwhile, John Hull, Dell's manager of Linux OS technologies on May 21 published "an overview of what customers can expect from our initial Ubuntu offering."

VectorLinux SOHO: A better Slackware than Slackware

VectorLinux has been one of my favorite projects since my first test of the distribution almost 18 months ago. I like VectorLinux because its roots are firmly planted in the stability and simplicity of Slackware, yet it comes with an extensive software base and lots of out-of-the-box great looks; in other words, a rock solid foundation with eye candy and useful functionality. While standard VectorLinux comes with the Xfce desktop environment and a variety of general-purpose applications, VectorLinux 5.8 SOHO offers the KDE desktop and a host of applications for small and home office users.

DistroWatch Weekly: First look at DeLi Linux 0.7.2, Mandriva layoffs, Famelix

  • DistroWatch.com; By Ladislav Bodnar (Posted by dave on May 21, 2007 10:05 PM EDT)
  • Story Type: Newsletter
Welcome to this year's 21st issue of DistroWatch Weekly! The feature story of the latest issue is a review of DeLi Linux 0.7.2, one of the few desktop distributions that targets old computers - those with as little as 8 MB of RAM. Does it really work as advertised? And are the included applications usable? Find out in our exclusive first look review by Susan Linton. In the news section, Mandriva terminates the contracts with several of its developers in order to cut costs, the openSUSE community launches an ambitious project to reduce the boot time of the distribution to 5 seconds, and Fedora removes Beagle from default install due to unresolved bugs. Finally, don't miss the stunning new desktop distribution from Brazil's Famelix project. Enjoy!

Build Linux lab equipment from a Sony PS3

The Cell Broadband Engine (Cell/B.E.) processor has attracted a lot of fashionable attention for applications involving game playing and network data processing. However, there are many other, arguably more entertaining uses for this technology.

Understanding MySQL Internals

Can you say "under the hood"? That's what Understanding MySQL Internals is supposed to teach, "in a nutshell" to coin a phrase. To quote part of the back cover, "MySQL's source code is open in the sense of being publicly available, but it's essentially closed to you if you don't understand it". Good point and one we tend to forget in the context of "open source". MySQL or any other open source code might as well be locked up in a vault and administered by Microsoft if you don't know what the code is and how to work with it. As a former member of the MySQL Development Team, Sasha Pachev is (or should be) positioned to take the reader on a guided tour of the inner workings of MySQL. Let's see how he does.

LAMP Bottleneck Solutions: Apache and PHP

Linux, Apache, MySQL, and PHP form the basis of the LAMP architecture for Web applications. This article focuses on steps you can take to optimize Apache and PHP, because as the load on an application increases, the bottlenecks in the underlying infrastructure become more apparent in the form of slow response to user requests.

Linux: Tracking Regressions

The task of tracking regressions between kernel releases has been picked up by Michal Piotrowski who maintains a"known regressions" wiki page at Kernel Newbies. The list is divided into sections and mailed out to the lkml after each release candidate.read more

QoS And Traffic Shaping For VoIP Users Using iproute2 And Asterisk

  • HowtoForge; By Aurelien Marchand (Posted by falko on May 21, 2007 5:25 PM EDT)
  • Story Type: Tutorial; Groups: Linux
The quality of my VoIP phone calls suffered whenever I was downloading or uploading anything. This was irritating, especially for those calling me (I heard them better than they heard me). So I poked at Iproute2 and other howtos, especially with regard to VoIP traffic, but I couldn't find anything that worked well. After some playing around, I've found settings that were right for me: consistant VoIP quality, regardless of any activities on the wire.

Linux: Kernel Graphics Subsystem

Jesse Barnes posted a summary of recent efforts to improve the Linux kernel's support for graphics, "in collaboration with the guys, we've been working on enhancing the kernel's graphics subsystem in an attempt to bring some sanity to the Linux graphics world and avoid the situation we have now where several kernel and userspace drivers compete for control of graphics devices." He then explained, "there are several reasons to pull modesetting and proper multihead support into the kernel: suspend/resume, debugging (e.g. panic), non-X uses, and more reliable VT switch," going on to offer detail on each of these listed reasons.

Microsoft's Patent on a Pile of Baloney

Can they get any more undignified or childish? This is the biggest software company on the planet, and the most obscenely rich company of all time. Yet they pout, throw public tantrums, and emit the most amazing line of pure baloney on a regular basis. Nothing is ever good enough and everyone picks on them, all those mean governments and unhappy users and mouthy Linux hippies and everyone.

Four ways to hide information inside image and sound objects

Ever find yourself with too many passwords to remember and no idea where to keep them so that only you can find the password list? Creating a password.txt file in your root directory is out of the question, as is a password-protected OpenOffice.org file. A piece of paper hidden somewhere is not a good idea, because after you forget where did you put it, someone else will find it and abuse it. Instead of these approaches, consider using steganography, a method for hiding sensitive information inside some other object, typically a JPEG picture or a sound file.

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