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Interview: The Brief on Groklaw

When Pamela Jones, better known as PJ, started Groklaw, a Web site devoted to covering and explaining legal cases of interest to the Free Software and Open Source communities, she preferred to remain anonymous and showed no desire to become well-known. Today, Groklaw and its founder are very famous (or infamous, depending on who you ask).

Murder, Code and Hans Reiser

Hans Reiser, well-known open-source developer, goes on trial Nov. 5 for the murder of his wife, Nina Reiser, in Alameda County Superior Court in California. Reiser is the founder of Namesys and creator and primary developer of the popular ReiserFS Linux file system.

Up close with the Eee PC user interface - part 2: Installing unsupported programs

Sure, the Asus Eee PC comes with a cool new user interface that makes the tiny laptop with the 7 inch screen easy to use even if you know nothing about Linux. But can you play Doom on it? Well yes, we're pretty sure you can, but we didn't try. What we did try was adding unsupported Debian Linux repositories that let you install a whole slew of applications beside the 40 or so that the Eee PC ships with. In part one of our series we looked at the "easy mode" interface. Now let's take a look at some of the hidden goodies Asus packed into this little box.

Google rallies allies in open Linux phone initiative

Google and 33 other companies have announced an ambitious industry alliance that will maintain a completely open source mobile phone stack. The Open Handset Alliance (OHA) says. The Android stack is based on "open Linux kernel," the group says. It also includes a full set of mobile phone application software, in order to "significantly lower the cost of developing and distributing mobile devices and services," OHA said. phones based on its Linux-based "Android" stack will reach market in as soon as eight months.

Call for papers for the Sixth Annual Southern California Linux Expo

A call for papers for the Sixth Annual So Cal Linux Expo. Registration is now open, speakers and exhibitors are signing up steadily for the February 8th-10th event.

LTSP saves old hardware in Brazilian doctor's office

Integrated Neurology Service SINEURO's office, located in São Paulo, Brazil, migrated from various versions of Windows (from 98 to XP) on a network of five computers with eight nonskilled computer users. I was the consultant in charge, and I spent no money on new hardware. Thank to the Linux Terminal Server Project (LTSP), hardware that's too old for new versions of Windows runs Linux applications just fine over a network from a server.

Van Wyk aims to transform Red Hat for future growth

Having established itself as the leading enterprise Linux vendor, Red Hat is in a pivotal phase of reinventing itself as a broader open-source software provider and a long-term technology leader a la Microsoft and Oracle. It's a tall order, and among other things it will take a business plan that lets the company move smoothly through this make-or-break stage.

Ubuntu - Outside the Sandbox

I've used Ubuntu Linux now for the better part of a year; there have been some stumbles along the way, but for the most part, I'm sold. I find myself having to do a bit more maintenance than I would with Windows, but I also like the flexibility that it affords me, along with knowing that I'm not being forced into using software in ways I don't want to (DRM), and not having to pay multiple hundreds of dollars to use it.

the_source Special Source 3 Released

On this special edition of the_source, Aaron goes to a Sun Microsystems open source summit. Interviews with Simon Phipps, Alan Coopersmith (X.org), Ian Murdock (Project Indiana) and Glynn Foster (Gnome, et al).

Up close with the Eee PC user interface - part 1

November 1st has come and gone, and that means that Asus has begun shipping the Eee PC, a $399 ultra-light laptop that could give both the OLPC and major laptop makers a run for their money. We're going to focus primarily on the software side of things, but in a nutshell, the first widely available model packs a 900MHz processor, 512MB of RAM and 4GB of solid state memory. It weighs just 2.1 pounds, has a 3.5 hour battery, and a tiny power adapter, making it a perfect machine for stuffing in your bag whenever you leave the house. But it also has a tiny 7 inch 800 x 480 pixel display, which can cause some problems with certain web sites and applications.

Open source, Lego-like computer modules run Linux

A six-person startup is readying a modular, open source hardware/software system resembling a set of electronic Legos. Bug Labs claims device developers can build "anything" using "Bug," which comprises an ARM11-powered base and various modular add-ons. Boldly suggesting that "CE" could someday stand for "community electronics" instead of "consumer electronics," Bug Labs invites hardware and software developers to contribute to the "open source" project, designing hardware and software modules of their own, and sharing their work back into the community. One suggested mix-and-match combo is a GPS/digital camera device that acts as a mobile, standalone Web service for publishing geo-tagged photos.

Tips and tricks: How do I set up SystemTap on domainU?

When deploying Red Hat Virtualization, the host operating system is domain0 or dom0, and the virtual machines that run on top of domain0 are domainU or domU. Installing SystemTap on domainU is no different from installing SystemTap on non-virtualized machine or domain0. Here's how to do it.

Are Linux users really a feral bunch?

It is not uncommon for those who write about Linux or other FOSS software to be inundated with feedback from users. At times that feedback is a bit unbalanced, a trifle raw and, occasionally, plain silly. It is, however, uncommon for a writer to set out to deliberately provoke Linux users with over-the-top stuff - just to prove his contention that said users are a bunch of ferals. This category of writers are called trolls; one surfaced recently in the shape of Infoworld's Russell Kennedy, who, in a three-part series titled "why Ubuntu (still) sucks", managed to rouse people enough to invite sufficient bile to prove his claim - which he laid out in the last part of that series.

Running FreeNX using a Mandriva 2008 Server

NoMachine NX is a Terminal Server and remote access solution based on a comprising set of enterprise class open source technologies. NX makes it possible to run any graphical application on any operating system across any network connection at incredible speed. FreeNX application/thin-client server is based on NoMachine’s NX technology. It can operate remote X11 sessions over 56k modem dialup links or anything better. FreeNX package contains a free (GPL) implementation of the nxserver component. The following workshop describes the FreeNX installation on a Mandriva 2008 Free server. Additionally it explains how to access it using a Windows XP and an OpenSuse 10.3 client.

Linus Torvalds on Open Source: 'A Much Better Way to Do Things'

"Linux really wouldn't have gone anywhere interesting at all if it hadn't been released as an open source product. I also think that the change to the GPLv2 from my original 'no money' license was important, because the commercial interests were actually very important from the beginning. The commercial distributions were what drove a lot of the nice installers and pushed people to improve usability," said Linux creator Linus Torvalds.

Google's gives the world (another) Linux phone OS

Google has unveiled its phone platform, Android. It's yet another Linux OS, freely licensed, that will appear in devices in the second half of next year. Google has signed up over 30 partners including Qualcomm, Motorola, HTC and operators including Deutsche Telekom for the "Open Handset Alliance".

Manage your music tags with EasyTag and Picard

When you listen to digital music, your software or hardware player usually shows information about the current song, which it gets from MP3 tags or Ogg Vorbis comments. Most ripping software supports acquiring this metadata from the CDDB or FreeDB services based on a CD's disc ID. But you can also can fill in and edit metadata with tools such as EasyTag and Picard.

Introducing: "The Monday Witness"

  • ConsortiumInfo.org Standards Blog; By Andy Updegrove (Posted by Andy_Updegrove on Nov 5, 2007 1:36 PM EDT)
  • Story Type: Editorial
Regular readers will know that my interest in standards is not limited to those that help make information and communications technology work. Over the years I've written about standards created to address concerns more directly relevant to the human condition, such as human rights standards, social responsibility standards, and much more. The world being what it is, I think that it's time I did so on a regular basis, and that's what this blog entry is all about.

Why I Dumped Beryl for Metacity

  • MadPenguin.org; By Matt Hartley (Posted by gsh on Nov 5, 2007 12:46 PM EDT)
  • Story Type: Editorial; Groups: GNOME
For a number of reasons, I have opted to leave my cube spinning days behind me, as it just did nothing for me. Certain applications ran poorly in Beryl, and while no fault should be placed on its development, I was finding myself booting into Metacity more and more for my GNOME desktop.

Now it’s Open Document Format’s turn for the FUDmeisters.

  • HackFUD (Posted by itron on Nov 5, 2007 11:49 AM EDT)
  • Story Type: Editorial
Okay, lets get one thing straight… Repeat after me : “The Open Document Foundation has nothing to do with the Open Document Format” “The Open Document Foundation has nothing to do with the Open Document Format” “The Open Document Foundation has nothing to do with the Open Document Format”

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