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Linux wins approval from the taxman

  • ZDNet UK; By Karen Gomm (Posted by tadelste on Oct 24, 2005 11:07 AM EDT)
  • Story Type: News Story
Linux is proving increasingly popular with governments across the world, with New Zealand's Inland Revenue becoming the latest government department to test the open source operating system.

Open source in government: A delusional cheer from the Greens

  • National Business Review; By Francis Till (Posted by tadelste on Oct 24, 2005 10:35 AM EDT)
  • Story Type: News Story
When Laurence Millar, Deputy Commissioner for information and communication technologies at the State Services Commission, last week celebrated the negotiation of an all-of-government license agreement between the Department of Inland Revenue and Novell, hardly an eyebrow was raised -- except in the Green camp, which exploded in a fit of irrational exuberance.

MySQL Steps Up

NEW YORK - For the past two years, as its simple database program has grown more and more popular, MySQL AB has been careful to insist that its software did not pose a threat to database giants like IBM, Microsoft and Oracle.

Those days are over. Today, the Uppsala, Sweden-based company rolls out an upgraded version of its program with high-end features that will let MySQL go toe-to-toe with its bigger rivals.

EuroOSCON - Remembering the End User

  • O'Reilly Network; By Daniel H. Steinberg (Posted by tadelste on Oct 24, 2005 8:38 AM EDT)
  • Story Type: Press Release
Editor's note: Daniel Steinberg reports on some of the sessions and keynotes that spanned the first two days of O'Reilly's first-ever European Open Source Convention, taking place in Amsterdam. In one way or another, these sessions--by Jeff Waugh, Alan Cox, and Simon Phipps--focused on the user. For more news items, press releases, blogs, and photos about the convention, check out our EuroOSCON Conference Coverage page.

'all-of-government' open source deal with Novell

A deal has been struck to allow agencies throughout government access to open-source software and support from Novell at preferential rates.

The arrangement is a syndicated procurement contract, according to which a lead agency does the main deal and others are allowed access to the same products and services on the same terms.

Greenlight your RFID systems

  • developerWorks; By IBM (Posted by VISITOR on Oct 24, 2005 8:06 AM EDT)
  • Groups: IBM; Story Type: News Story
Incorporate a Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) framework and connect to various interface types. Learn how to integrate the RFID framework with back-end applications and implement business logic. This article provides the answers to getting it all done.

2004-2005annual Report on China's Linux Software Market

Beginning with a review of the growth and size of the global and Chinese Linux software markets in 2004, the report analyzes competition situation in China’s Linux software market in the respects of product structure, market structure and brand competition structure. It takes a look at the characteristics of supply and demand in the market in 2004, and presents comprehensive evaluation of leading vendors’ competitiveness. Research findings show that in 2004,

The Apache Portable Runtime

If you’ve ever had to write a portable application in C, you’ve likely run into the same problem faced by countless other programmers: no matter how much you try to stick to a well-defined application programming interface (API), the program just doesn’t work the same on every platform.

While POSIX does a passable job of providing a portable API for most Unix and Unix-like platforms, POSIX either doesn’t exist on other operating systems or is so full of bugs as to be unusable. Moreover, POSIX isn’t always the best choice. Non-Unix platforms, such as Microsoft Windows, have their own APIs that are better mantained and perform better on that platform.

User companies pool on PostgreSQL enhancement

  • NewsForge (Posted by dave on Oct 24, 2005 7:30 AM EDT)
  • Story Type: News Story
When faced with a pay-now or wait-for-functionality choice, several companies that use PostgreSQL recently pooled their resources and paid for development of faster, deeper indexing capabilities in the open source database.

CSPI Selects Myricom's Myri-10G for its 2nd Generation of Rugged Clusters

  • PR Newswire; By Press release (Posted by tadelste on Oct 24, 2005 7:17 AM EDT)
  • Story Type: Press Release
Partnership Brings HPC Capability and 10GbE Interoperability to Embedded Cluster Computing

Google - What Have You Done For Us Lately?

Google may be taking the Internet by storm, but in the process they are raining on the Linux parade. Google has clearly presented The Community a middle finger salute. The technology that paved their streets with gold is now being cast away like a pock-marked leper.

Bug Squashing Party next weekend, October 28 - 30

Since the last Bug Squashing Party (BSP) we managed to keep the number of release critical bugs from growing which is better than we did after the one before but certainly not good enough.

DistroWatch Weekly: Bob Young, Tompkins County, LG3D LiveCD, LJ Reader's Choice

  • DistroWatch.com; By Ladislav Bodnar (Posted by dave on Oct 24, 2005 6:05 AM EDT)
  • Story Type: Newsletter
Welcome to this year's 43rd issue of DistroWatch Weekly. Several interesting new distribution releases appeared during the past week. LG3D LiveCD deserves a more detailed look due to its unusual desktop and amazing 3D visual effects, while the newly renamed RR4 Linux live DVD is probably the easiest way yet to install Gentoo Linux on a hard disk. Also in this issue: a brief history of Red Hat prompted by the resignation of the company's co-founder Bob Young, a comment about the unusual Internet security guidelines published by a local government in the state of New York, and a few signs that our readers do love and appreciate DistroWatch. Happy reading! Join us at irc.freenode.net #distrowatch

Review: Sun's Ultra 3 Mobile Workstation

  • NewsForge (Posted by dave on Oct 24, 2005 1:30 AM EDT)
  • Groups: Sun; Story Type: News Story
Despite its recent announcement of servers based on AMD64 CPUs, Sun Microsystems is still gung-ho about its 64-bit UltraSPARC computers. The newest addition to Sun's workstation array is the portable Ultra 3 Mobile Workstation. At first glance you might think it's a fancy-looking notebook system, but on closer inspection you'll discover that it's got all the power of a Sun Blade workstation in a fraction of the size.

CLI Magic: lsof

  • NewsForge (Posted by dave on Oct 24, 2005 12:30 AM EDT)
  • Story Type: News Story
Last week's CLI Magic column was about Trojan Scan, a useful tool -- still in alpha development phase -- for warding off the bad guys. I noted then that the utility was based on the lsof command -- actually, based on just one of the hundreds of combinations of arguments used to tell lsof exactly what it is you want from it. This week we're going to take a longer look at lsof, and see a few of the other mysteries it can solve.

The Mini-ITX Project Part II

Once my original Mini-ITX project was completed I finally had a chance to sit back and use the computer. Knowing how simple my needs were, the Mini-ITX project computer was orginally designed to be as basic and quiet as possible. This meant no hard drive, no extra accessories- just a stripped down system. While this suited my needs well at the time, its lack of versatility soon became an issue.

Feds: Microsoft tried to cut out music software rivals

  • (AP) (Posted by VISITOR on Oct 23, 2005 8:51 PM EDT)
Microsoft Corp., already under government scrutiny over its behavior toward competitors, told manufacturers of iPod-like portable audio devices that under a new marketing program they would not allowed to distribute rivals' music player software but pulled back after one company protested.

The Justice Department said it decided to drop the issue because Microsoft agreed 10 days later to change the proposal.

[ED - And the Justice department believe MS precisely Why? ]

New Web Software a Challenge to Microsoft

NEW YORK - A quiet revolution is transforming life on the Internet: New, agile software now lets people quickly check flight options, see stock prices fluctuate and better manage their online photos and e-mail. Such tools make computing less of a chore because they sit on distant Web servers and run over standard browsers. Users thus don't have to worry about installing software or moving data when they switch computers.

Some `open' muscle-building

  • The Hindu Business Line; By Krishnan Thiagarajan (Posted by tadelste on Oct 23, 2005 4:31 PM EDT)
  • Groups: Oracle; Story Type: News Story
Three recent moves by eBay, Google and Oracle are aimed at building global online communities that thrive on open standards.

What do to when apt-get fails

When you install an application package in a Debian-based system, sometimes prerequisite application packages are unavailable. These missing packages are known as broken dependencies. Left unresolved, they can cripple your system's ability to install new packages. They're a disaster that isn't supposed to happen in Debian, thanks to the Advanced Packaging Tool (APT) and the scripts contained in Debian packages. That makes broken dependencies all the more devastating when they happen. Some users have even been known to reinstall the whole operating system, despairing of otherwise having a functioning package management system. However, depending on how the broken dependencies arose, you have several options to try before you consider reinstalling.

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